The Souls of Black Folk

Author: W. E. B. Du Bois
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191604909
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
'The problem of the twentieth-century is the problem of the color-line.' Originally published in 1903, The Souls of Black Folk is a classic study of race, culture, and education at the turn of the twentieth century. With its singular combination of essays, memoir, and fiction, this book vaulted W. E. B. Du Bois to the forefront of American political commentary and civil rights activism. The Souls of Black Folk is an impassioned, at times searing account of the situation of African Americans in the United States. Du Bois makes a forceful case for the access of African Americans to higher education, memorably extols the achievements of black culture (above all the spirituals or 'sorrow songs'), and advances the provocative and influential argument that due to the inequalities and pressures of the 'race problem', African American identity is characterized by 'double consciousness'. This edition includes a valuable appendix of other writing by Du Bois, which sheds light on his attitudes and intentions. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Darkwater

Author: William Edward Burghardt Du Bois
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780195325775
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Classic work on race, class and gender by the civil rights activist and leader, sociologist, educator, historian, prolific writer, editor, poet, scholar, and socialist.

The Souls of Black Folk

Author: William Edward Burghardt Du Bois
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195325737
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Originally published in 1903, The Souls of Black Folk is a classic study of race, culture, and education at the turn of the twentieth century. With its singular combination of essays, memoir, and fiction, this book vaulted Du Bois to the forefront of American political commentary and civil rights activism. It is an impassioned, at times searing account of the situation of African Americans in the United States, making a forceful case for the access of African Americans to higher education and extolling the achievements of black culture. Du Bois advances the provocative and influential argument that due to the inequalities and pressures of the race problem, African American identity is characterized by double consciousness. This edition includes a valuable appendix of other writings by Du Bois, which sheds light on his motivation and his goals.

Early American Writing

Author: Various
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101522806
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Drawing materials from journals and diaries, political documents and religious sermons, prose and poetry, Giles Gunn's anthology provides a panoramic survey of early American life and literature—including voices black and white, male and female, Hispanic, French, and Native American. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.

W E B Du Bois A Reader

Author: William Edward Burghardt Du Bois
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805032642
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
The essential writings of Du Bois have been selected and edited by David Levering Lewis, his Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer.

Uptown Conversation

Author: Robert O'Meally
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231508360
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Jackson Pollock dancing to the music as he painted; Romare Bearden's stage and costume designs for Alvin Ailey and Dianne McIntyre; Stanley Crouch stirring his high-powered essays in a room where a drumkit stands at the center: from the perspective of

The World and Africa

Author: W. E. B. Du Bois
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781614278757
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
2015 Reprint of 1947 Edition. Full facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. "Can the freedom-loving modern world close its eyes and ears to the exploitation by foreigners of a continent three times the size of Europe and four times that of the United States, and to the centuries-old oppression of its widely scattered people?" This is the question which the author raises in this work. To document his declarations concerning the injustices which have been meted out to blacks by their white exploiters, Dubois recounts the entire history of the continent-the vast contributions of ancient and modern Africa to world culture, industry and development, contributions that have often been overlooked by mainstream historians.

The Hero s Fight

Author: Patricia Fernández-Kelly
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400883563
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Baltimore was once a vibrant manufacturing town, but today, with factory closings and steady job loss since the 1970s, it is home to some of the most impoverished neighborhoods in America. The Hero's Fight provides an intimate look at the effects of deindustrialization on the lives of Baltimore’s urban poor, and sheds critical light on the unintended consequences of welfare policy on our most vulnerable communities. Drawing on her own uniquely immersive brand of fieldwork, conducted over the course of a decade in the neighborhoods of West Baltimore, Patricia Fernández-Kelly tells the stories of people like D. B. Wilson, Big Floyd, Towanda, and others whom the American welfare state treats with a mixture of contempt and pity—what Fernández-Kelly calls "ambivalent benevolence." She shows how growing up poor in the richest nation in the world involves daily interactions with agents of the state, an experience that differs significantly from that of more affluent populations. While ordinary Americans are treated as citizens and consumers, deprived and racially segregated populations are seen as objects of surveillance, containment, and punishment. Fernández-Kelly provides new insights into such topics as globalization and its effects on industrial decline and employment, the changing meanings of masculinity and femininity among the poor, social and cultural capital in poor neighborhoods, and the unique roles played by religion and entrepreneurship in destitute communities. Blending compelling portraits with in-depth scholarly analysis, The Hero’s Fight explores how the welfare state contributes to the perpetuation of urban poverty in America.