The Supreme Court

Author: Jeffrey Rosen
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805081824
Format: PDF, Docs
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A compelling character-driven history of the Supreme Court traces its evolution from the perspective of the personal, philosophical, political, and judicial rivalries on the bench that transformed the law--from the conflict between Chief Justice John Marshall and Thomas Jefferson, to present-day tensions between conservatives William H. Rehnquist and Antonin Scalia. 75,000 first printing.

Louis D Brandeis

Author: Jeffrey Rosen
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300160445
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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According to Jeffrey Rosen, Louis D. Brandeis was “the Jewish Jefferson,” the greatest critic of what he called “the curse of bigness,” in business and government, since the author of the Declaration of Independence. Published to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of his Supreme Court confirmation on June 1, 1916, Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet argues that Brandeis was the most farseeing constitutional philosopher of the twentieth century. In addition to writing the most famous article on the right to privacy, he also wrote the most important Supreme Court opinions about free speech, freedom from government surveillance, and freedom of thought and opinion. And as the leader of the American Zionist movement, he convinced Woodrow Wilson and the British government to recognize a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Combining narrative biography with a passionate argument for why Brandeis matters today, Rosen explores what Brandeis, the Jeffersonian prophet, can teach us about historic and contemporary questions involving the Constitution, monopoly, corporate and federal power, technology, privacy, free speech, and Zionism.

Freedom for the Thought That We Hate

Author: Anthony Lewis
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465012930
Format: PDF, Kindle
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More than any other people on earth, we Americans are free to say and write what we think. The press can air the secrets of government, the corporate boardroom, or the bedroom with little fear of punishment or penalty. This extraordinary freedom results not from America's culture of tolerance, but from fourteen words in the constitution: the free expression clauses of the First Amendment. In Freedom for the Thought That We Hate, two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Anthony Lewis describes how our free-speech rights were created in five distinct areas—political speech, artistic expression, libel, commercial speech, and unusual forms of expression such as T-shirts and campaign spending. It is a story of hard choices, heroic judges, and the fascinating and eccentric defendants who forced the legal system to come face to face with one of America's great founding ideas.

The Most Democratic Branch

Author: Jeffrey Rosen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195346602
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Many critics attack federal judges as anti-democratic elitists, activists out of step with the mainstream of American thought. But others argue that judges should stand alone as the ultimate guardians of American values, placing principle before the views of the people. In The Most Democratic Branch, Jeffrey Rosen disagrees with both assertions. Contrary to what interest groups may claim, he contends that, from the days of John Marshall right up to the present, the federal courts by and large have reflected the opinions of the mainstream. More important, he argues that the Supreme Court is most successful when it defers to the constitutional views of the American people, as represented most notably by Congress and the Presidency. And on the rare occasion when they departed from the consensus, the result has often been a disaster. To illustrate, Rosen provides a penetrating look at some of the most important Supreme Court cases in American history--cases involving racial equality, affirmative action, abortion, gay rights and gay marriage, the right to die, electoral disputes, and civil liberties in wartime. Rosen shows that the most notorious constitutional decisions in American history--the ones that have been most strenuously criticized, such as Dred Scott or Roe v. Wade--have gone against mainstream opinion. By contrast, the most successful decisions--from Marbury v. Madison to Brown v. Board of Education--have avoided imposing constitutional principles over the wishes of the people. Rosen concludes that the judiciary works best when it identifies the constitutional principles accepted by a majority of Americans, and enforces them unequivocally as fundamental law. Jeffrey Rosen is one of the most respected legal experts writing today, a regular contributor to The New York Times Magazine and the Legal Affairs Editor of The New Republic. The provocative arguments that he puts forth here are bound to fuel heated debate at a time when the federal judiciary is already the focus of fierce criticism.

A People s History of the Supreme Court

Author: Peter Irons
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101503133
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A comprehensive history of the people and cases that have changed history, this is the definitive account of the nation's highest court Recent changes in the Supreme Court have placed the venerable institution at the forefront of current affairs, making this comprehensive and engaging work as timely as ever. In the tradition of Howard Zinn's classic A People's History of the United States, Peter Irons chronicles the decisions that have influenced virtually every aspect of our society, from the debates over judicial power to controversial rulings in the past regarding slavery, racial segregation, and abortion, as well as more current cases about school prayer, the Bush/Gore election results, and "enemy combatants." To understand key issues facing the supreme court and the current battle for the court's ideological makeup, there is no better guide than Peter Irons. This revised and updated edition includes a foreword by Howard Zinn. "A sophisticated narrative history of the Supreme Court . . . [Irons] breathes abundant life into old documents and reminds readers that today's fiercest arguments about rights are the continuation of the endless American conversation." -Publisher's Weekly (starred review)

The Naked Crowd

Author: Jeffrey Rosen
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
ISBN: 0375759859
Format: PDF, ePub
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Argues that in the effort to catch terrorists and prevent future terrorist attacks essential American rights to privacy and liberty are being violated and explains how legislation and technology can create an effective and reasonable balance between security and liberty.

Peyote Vs the State

Author: Garrett Epps
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806185554
Format: PDF
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The story of the constitutional showdown over Native Americans’ religious use of peyote With the grace of a novel, this book chronicles the six-year duel between two remarkable men with different visions of religious freedom in America. Neither sought the conflict. Al Smith, a substance-abuse counselor to Native Americans, wanted only to earn a living. Dave Frohnmayer, the attorney general of Oregon, was planning his gubernatorial campaign and seeking care for his desperately ill daughters. But before this constitutional confrontation was over, Frohnmayer and Smith twice asked the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether the First Amendment protects the right of American Indians to seek and worship God through the use of peyote. The Court finally said no. Garrett Epps tracks the landmark case from the humblest hearing room to the Supreme Court chamber—and beyond. This paperback edition includes a new epilogue by the author that explores a retreat from the ruling since it was handed down in 1990. Weaving fascinating legal narrative with personal drama, Peyote vs. the State offers a riveting look at how justice works—and sometimes doesn’t—in America today.

Constitution 3 0

Author: Jeffrey Rosen
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815724500
Format: PDF, Docs
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"Explores the challenges to constitutional values posed by sweeping technological changes such as social networks, brain scans, and genetic selection and suggests ways of preserving rights, including privacy, free speech, and dignity in the age of Facebook and Google"--

Packing the Court

Author: James Macgregor Burns
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101081902
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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From renowned political theorist James MacGregor Burns, an incisive critique of the overreaching power of an ideological Supreme Court For decades, Pulitzer Prize-winner James MacGregor Burns has been one of the great masters of the study of power and leadership in America. In Packing the Court, he turns his eye to the U.S. Supreme Court, an institution that he believes has become more powerful, and more partisan, than the founding fathers ever intended. In a compelling and provocative narrative, Burns reveals how the Supreme Court has served as a reactionary force in American politics at critical moments throughout the nation's history, and concludes with a bold proposal to rein in the court's power.

Supreme Conflict

Author: Jan Crawford Greenburg
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781594201011
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Discusses recent ideological shifts within the Supreme Court, profiles controversial judges, and analyzes the changing role of judicial power in American government.