The Nile Natural and Cultural Landscape in Egypt

Author: Harco Willems
Publisher: transcript Verlag
ISBN: 383943615X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Although Herodot's dictum that "Egypt is a gift of the Nile" is proverbial, there has been only scant attention to the way the river impacted on ancient Egyptian society. Egyptologists frequently focus on the textual and iconographic record, whereas archaeologists and earth scientists approach the issue from the perspective of natural sciences. The contributions in this volume bridge this gap by analyzing the river both as a natural and as a cultural phenomenon. Adopting an approach of cultural ecology, it addresses issues like ancient land use, administration and taxation, irrigation, and religious concepts.

Historical Dictionary of Ancient Egypt

Author: Morris L. Bierbrier
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 9780810862500
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The great pyramids of Giza, Tutankhamun, the Great Sphinx, Cleopatra, and Ramesses II: the names and achievements of Ancient Egypt are legendary. Situated along the Nile River, the Ancient Egyptian civilization began around 3150 BC and lasted over three millennia until it was conquered by Rome in 31 BC. The second edition of the Historical Dictionary of Ancient Egypt expands upon the information presented in the first with a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on Egyptian rulers, bureaucrats, and commoners whose records have survived, as well as ancient society, religion, and gods.

A History of Knowledge

Author: Charles Lincoln Van Doren
Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.
ISBN: 0345373162
Format: PDF, ePub
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Covers every aspect of knowledge--scientific, intellectual, and historical--from the beginning of the human experience into the twenty-first century and beyond

The Eastern Libyans 1914

Author: Oric Bates
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136248773
Format: PDF, Kindle
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First published in 1914, this is a systematic treatment of the people whose contribution to civilization of the Nile Valley was for so long a source of controversy.

Kom Firin I

Author: Neal Spencer
Publisher: British Museum Publications Limited
ISBN: 9780861591701
Format: PDF
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This is the first monograph on the British Museum fieldwork at Kom Firin in Egypt's Nile Delta, a settlement created around the time of Ramses II, and occupied until late Antiquity. This volume focuses on the survey and remote sensing of the site, along with a full publication of the Ramesside temple.

Migrations Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Author: Michi Messer
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3709109507
Format: PDF, ePub
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This volume covers the most important contributions to and discussions at the international symposium Migrations: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (1-3, July, University of Vienna), organised by Renée Schroeder and Ruth Wodak which was dedicated to the multiple interdisciplinary dimensions of ‘migrations’, both from the viewpoints of the Social Sciences and Humanities as well as from the manifold perspectives of the Natural Sciences. The book is organized along the following dimensions: Urban Development and Migration Peer Relations in Immigrant Adolescents: Methodological Challenges and Key Findings Migration, Identity, and Belonging Migration in/and Ego Documents Debating Migration Fundamentals of Diffusion and Spread in the Natural Sciences and beyond Media Representations of Migrants and Migration Migration and the Genes

Pharaoh s Land and Beyond

Author: Pearce Paul Creasman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190229071
Format: PDF
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The concept of pharaonic Egypt as a unified, homogeneous, and isolated cultural entity is misleading. Ancient Egypt was a rich tapestry of social, religious, technological, and economic interconnections among numerous cultures from disparate lands. This volume uniquely examines Egypt'srelationship with its wider world through fifteen chapters arranged in five thematic groups. The first three chapters detail the geographical contexts of interconnections through examination of ancient Egyptian exploration, maritime routes, and overland passages. The next three chapters address thehuman principals of association: peoples, with the attendant difficulties differentiating ethnic identities from the record; diplomatic actors, with their complex balances and presentations of power; and the military, with its evolving role in pharaonic expansion. Natural events, too, playedsignificant roles in the pharaonic world: geological disasters, the effects of droughts and floods on the Nile, and illness and epidemics all delivered profound impacts, as is seen in the third section. Physical manifestations of interconnections between pharaonic Egypt and its neighbors in the formof objects are the focus of the fourth set: trade, art and architecture, and a specific case study of scarabs. The final section discusses in depth perhaps the most powerful means of interconnection: ideas. Whether through diffusion and borrowing of knowledge and technology, through the flow of words by script and literature, or through exchanges in the religious sphere, the pharaonic Egypt that we know today was constantly changing - and changing the cultures around it.

Historical Dictionary of Middle Eastern Cinema

Author: Terri Ginsberg
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 9780810873643
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Historical Dictionary of Middle Eastern Cinema covers the production and exhibition of cinema in the Middle East and in other communities whose heritage is from the region and whose films commonly reflect this background. It covers the cinemas of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. In addition, it includes the non-Arab states of Turkey and Iran, as well as the Jewish state of Israel.

Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology

Author: William A. Longacre
Publisher: Century Collection
ISBN: 9780816534791
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Ethnoarchaeology, the study of material culture in a living society by archaeologists, facilitates the extraction of information from prehistoric materials as well. Studies of contemporary pottery-making were initiated in the southwestern United States toward the end of the nineteenth century, then abandoned as a result of changes in archaeological theory. Now a resurgence in ethnoarchaeology over the past twenty-five years offers a new set of directions for the discipline. This volume presents the results of such work with pottery, a class of materials that occurs abundantly in many archaeological sites. Drawing on projects undertaken around the world, in the Phillipines, East Africa, Mesoamerica, India, in both traditional and complex societies, the contributors focus on identifying social and behavioral sources of ceramic variation to show how analogical reasoning is fundamental to archaeological interpretation. As the number of pottery-making societies declines, opportunities for such research must be seized. By bringing together a variety of ceramic ethnoarchaeological analyses, this volume offers the profession a much-needed touchstone on method and theory for the study of pottery-making among living peoples.