Theory of Liberty Legitimacy and Power

Author: Vatro Murvar
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135032211
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
The stature of Max Weber (1864-1920) as an interdisciplinary, historical-comparative social scientist has grown steadily. But in view of Professor Murvar, his work has been misinterpreted with remarkable frequency. The aim of this book is to put right certain misconceptions and misinterpretations of Max Weber's intellectual and scientific legacy. This book challenges assumptions about various aspects of Weber's work; the issues of modernization, evolutionary theories, world systems, growth of liberty, typologies of power structures and legitimacies, among others. As well as presenting precise criticism and appreciation of the way Weber's work has been handled by his successors, this book also details the specific advancement he himself made within the theory of liberty, legitimacy and power. There is special emphasis on how much Weber's work in these core areas has survived the test of time. This book was first published in 1985.

Ideology Legitimacy and the New State

Author: Sinisa Malesevic
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136341765
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
A comparative analysis of the dominant ideologies and modes of legitimization in communist Yugoslavia and post-Communist Serbia and Croatia. The aim of the book is to identify and explain dominant normative and operative ideologies and principal modes of legitimization in these three case studies.

Power Versus Liberty

Author: James H. Read
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813919126
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Does every increase in the power of government entail a loss of liberty for the people? James H. Read examines how four key Founders--James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, James Wilson, and Thomas Jefferson--wrestled with this question during the first two decades of the American Republic. Power versus Liberty reconstructs a four-way conversation--sometimes respectful, sometimes shrill--that touched on the most important issues facing the new nation: the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, federal authority versus states' rights, freedom of the press, the controversial Bank of the United States, the relation between nationalism and democracy, and the elusive meaning of "the consent of the governed." Each of the men whose thought Read considers differed on these key questions. Jefferson believed that every increase in the power of government came at the expense of liberty: energetic governments, he insisted, are always oppressive. Madison believed that this view was too simple, that liberty can be threatened either by too much or too little governmental power. Hamilton and Wilson likewise rejected the Jeffersonian view of power and liberty but disagreed with Madison and with each other. The question of how to reconcile energetic government with the liberty of citizens is as timely today as it was in the first decades of the Republic. It pervades our political discourse and colors our readings of events from the confrontation at Waco to the Oklahoma City bombing to Congressional debate over how to spend the government surplus. While the rhetoric of both major political parties seems to posit a direct relationship between the size of our government and the scope of our political freedoms, the debates of Madison, Hamilton, Wilson, and Jefferson confound such simple dichotomies. As Read concludes, the relation between power and liberty is inherently complex.

Legitimacy in the Modern State

Author: John H. Schaar
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 9781412827485
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
This analysis of the concept of authority in Western society constitutes a central work in political sociology and a fundamental critique of the process of modernization. Schaar proposes that legitimate authority is declining in the modern state. Law and order, in a very real sense, is the basic political issue of our time -- one that conservatives have understood with greater clarity than their liberal adversaries. Schaar sees what were once authoritative institutions and ideas yielding to technological and bureaucratic orders. The later brings physical comfort and a sense of collective power, but does not provide political liberty or moral autonomy. As a result, he argues, all modern states exhibiting this transformation of authority into technology are well advanced along the path of a crisis of legitimacy.

The Clash of Rights

Author: Paul M. Sniderman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300069815
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Based on interviews with thousands of citizens and political decisions makers, the book focuses on modern Canadian politics, investigating why a country so fortunate in its history and circumstances is on the brink of dissolution.

Constitutionalism and the Separation of Powers

Author: M. J. C. Vile
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780865971752
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Arguably no political principle has been more central than the separation of powers to the evolution of constitutional governance in Western democracies. In the definitive work on the subject, M. J. C. Vile traces the history of the doctrine from its rise during the English Civil War, through its development in the eighteenth century—when it was indispensable to the founders of the American republic—through subsequent political thought and constitution-making in Britain, France, and the United States. The author concludes with an examination of criticisms of the doctrine by both behavioralists and centralizers—and with "A Model of a Theory of Constitutionalism." The new Liberty Fund second edition includes the entirety of the original 1967 text published by Oxford, a major epilogue entitled "The Separation of Powers and the Administrative State," and a bibliography. M. J. C. Vile is Professor of Politics at the University of Kent at Canterbury and author also of The Structure of American Federalism.

A Theory of Legitimate Expectations for Public Administration

Author: Alexander Brown
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192545558
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
It is an unfortunate but unavoidable feature of even well-ordered democratic societies that governmental administrative agencies often create legitimate expectations (procedural or substantive) on the part of non-governmental agents (individual citizens, groups, businesses, organizations, institutions, and instrumentalities) but find themselves unable to fulfil those expectations for reasons of justice, the public interest, severe financial constraints, and sometimes harsh political realities. How governmental administrative agencies, operating on behalf of society, handle the creation and frustration of legitimate expectations implicates a whole host of values that we have reason to care about, including under non-ideal conditions-not least justice, fairness, autonomy, the rule of law, responsible uses of power, credible commitments, reliance interests, security of expectations, stability, democracy, parliamentary supremacy, and legitimate authority. This book develops a new theory of legitimate expectations for public administration drawing on normative arguments from political and legal theory. Brown begins by offering a new account of the legitimacy of legitimate expectations. He argues that it is the very responsibility of governmental administrative agencies for creating expectations that ought to ground legitimacy, as opposed to the justice or the legitimate authority of those agencies and expectations. He also clarifies some of the main ways in which agencies can be responsible for creating expectations. Moreover, he argues that governmental administrative agencies should be held liable for losses they directly cause by creating and then frustrating legitimate expectations on the part of non-governmental agents and, if liable, have an obligation to make adequate compensation payments in respect of those losses.

Evaluating Parental Power

Author: Allyn Fives
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1784994324
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Is parental power over children legitimate? And what role do both theoretical analysis and practical judgement play when we make such normative evaluations? While this book adds to the growing literature on parents, children, families and the state, it primarily focuses on one issue: the legitimacy of parents' power. It also seriously considers the challenge posed by moral pluralism, and analyses the role of both theoretical rationality and practical judgement in resolving moral dilemmas associated with parental power. The book makes a number of conceptual and methodological innovations. Whilst parental power is usually conceptualised as a form of paternalism, this book shows that non-paternalistic parental power can be legitimate as well. Although such power is often assumed to involve interference with children's liberty, there is in fact a plurality of forms of parental power. And whilst political theorists offer general rules to resolve dilemmas arising between competing moral claims, it is demonstrated here that, in the evaluation of parental power, practical judgements are required in specific cases. A number of such cases of parental power are explored here at length, including parental licenses, children's informed consent, and civic education.

Liberty and Coercion

Author: Gary Gerstle
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400888433
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
American governance is burdened by a paradox. On the one hand, Americans don't want "big government" meddling in their lives; on the other hand, they have repeatedly enlisted governmental help to impose their views regarding marriage, abortion, religion, and schooling on their neighbors. These contradictory stances on the role of public power have paralyzed policymaking and generated rancorous disputes about government’s legitimate scope. How did we reach this political impasse? Historian Gary Gerstle, looking at two hundred years of U.S. history, argues that the roots of the current crisis lie in two contrasting theories of power that the Framers inscribed in the Constitution. One theory shaped the federal government, setting limits on its power in order to protect personal liberty. Another theory molded the states, authorizing them to go to extraordinary lengths, even to the point of violating individual rights, to advance the "good and welfare of the commonwealth." The Framers believed these theories could coexist comfortably, but conflict between the two has largely defined American history. Gerstle shows how national political leaders improvised brilliantly to stretch the power of the federal government beyond where it was meant to go—but at the cost of giving private interests and state governments too much sway over public policy. The states could be innovative, too. More impressive was their staying power. Only in the 1960s did the federal government, impelled by the Cold War and civil rights movement, definitively assert its primacy. But as the power of the central state expanded, its constitutional authority did not keep pace. Conservatives rebelled, making the battle over government’s proper dominion the defining issue of our time. From the Revolution to the Tea Party, and the Bill of Rights to the national security state, Liberty and Coercion is a revelatory account of the making and unmaking of government in America.