Topology and Geometry

Author: Glen E. Bredon
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1475768486
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book offers an introductory course in algebraic topology. Starting with general topology, it discusses differentiable manifolds, cohomology, products and duality, the fundamental group, homology theory, and homotopy theory. From the reviews: "An interesting and original graduate text in topology and geometry...a good lecturer can use this text to create a fine course....A beginning graduate student can use this text to learn a great deal of mathematics."—-MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS

Topology and Geometry

Author: Glen E. Bredon
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780387979267
Format: PDF
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The golden age of mathematics-that was not the age of Euclid, it is ours. C. J. KEYSER This time of writing is the hundredth anniversary of the publication (1892) of Poincare's first note on topology, which arguably marks the beginning of the subject of algebraic, or "combinatorial," topology. There was earlier scattered work by Euler, Listing (who coined the word "topology"), Mobius and his band, Riemann, Klein, and Betti. Indeed, even as early as 1679, Leibniz indicated the desirability of creating a geometry of the topological type. The establishment of topology (or "analysis situs" as it was often called at the time) as a coherent theory, however, belongs to Poincare. Curiously, the beginning of general topology, also called "point set topology," dates fourteen years later when Frechet published the first abstract treatment of the subject in 1906. Since the beginning of time, or at least the era of Archimedes, smooth manifolds (curves, surfaces, mechanical configurations, the universe) have been a central focus in mathematics. They have always been at the core of interest in topology. After the seminal work of Milnor, Smale, and many others, in the last half of this century, the topological aspects of smooth manifolds, as distinct from the differential geometric aspects, became a subject in its own right.

Topology

Author: Terry Lawson
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780199202485
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This new-in-paperback introduction to topology emphasizes a geometric approach with a focus on surfaces. A primary feature is a large collection of exercises and projects, which fosters a teaching style that encourages the student to be an active class participant. A wide range of material at different levels supports flexible use of the book for a variety of students. Part I is appropriate for a one-semester or two-quarter course, and Part II (which is problem based) allows the book to be used for a year-long course which supports a variety of syllabuses. The over 750 exercises range from simple checks of omitted details in arguments, to reinforce the material and increase student involvement, to the development of substantial theorems that have been broken into many steps. The style encourages an active student role. Solutions to selected exercises are included as an appendix, with solutions to all exercises available to the instructor on a companion website.

Algebraic Topology

Author: William Fulton
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461241804
Format: PDF, ePub
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To the Teacher. This book is designed to introduce a student to some of the important ideas of algebraic topology by emphasizing the re lations of these ideas with other areas of mathematics. Rather than choosing one point of view of modem topology (homotopy theory, simplicial complexes, singular theory, axiomatic homology, differ ential topology, etc.), we concentrate our attention on concrete prob lems in low dimensions, introducing only as much algebraic machin ery as necessary for the problems we meet. This makes it possible to see a wider variety of important features of the subject than is usual in a beginning text. The book is designed for students of mathematics or science who are not aiming to become practicing algebraic topol ogists-without, we hope, discouraging budding topologists. We also feel that this approach is in better harmony with the historical devel opment of the subject. What would we like a student to know after a first course in to pology (assuming we reject the answer: half of what one would like the student to know after a second course in topology)? Our answers to this have guided the choice of material, which includes: under standing the relation between homology and integration, first on plane domains, later on Riemann surfaces and in higher dimensions; wind ing numbers and degrees of mappings, fixed-point theorems; appli cations such as the Jordan curve theorem, invariance of domain; in dices of vector fields and Euler characteristics; fundamental groups

Geometric Topology in Dimensions 2 and 3

Author: E.E. Moise
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461299063
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Geometric topology may roughly be described as the branch of the topology of manifolds which deals with questions of the existence of homeomorphisms. Only in fairly recent years has this sort of topology achieved a sufficiently high development to be given a name, but its beginnings are easy to identify. The first classic result was the SchOnflies theorem (1910), which asserts that every 1-sphere in the plane is the boundary of a 2-cell. In the next few decades, the most notable affirmative results were the "Schonflies theorem" for polyhedral 2-spheres in space, proved by J. W. Alexander [Ad, and the triangulation theorem for 2-manifolds, proved by T. Rad6 [Rd. But the most striking results of the 1920s were negative. In 1921 Louis Antoine [A ] published an extraordinary paper in which he 4 showed that a variety of plausible conjectures in the topology of 3-space were false. Thus, a (topological) Cantor set in 3-space need not have a simply connected complement; therefore a Cantor set can be imbedded in 3-space in at least two essentially different ways; a topological 2-sphere in 3-space need not be the boundary of a 3-cell; given two disjoint 2-spheres in 3-space, there is not necessarily any third 2-sphere which separates them from one another in 3-space; and so on and on. The well-known "horned sphere" of Alexander [A ] appeared soon thereafter.

Invitations to Geometry and Topology

Author: Martin R. Bridson
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780198507727
Format: PDF, Docs
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This volume presents an array of topics that introduce the reader to key ideas in active areas in geometry and topology. The material is presented in a way that both graduate students and researchers should find accessible and enticing. The topics covered range from Morse theory and complex geometry theory to geometric group theory, and are accompanied by exercises that are designed to deepen the reader's understanding and to guide them in exciting directions for future investigation. The editors, M.R. Bridson and S.M. Salamon, have each written an article and are accompanied by A.J. Berrick; M.C. Crabb and A.J.B Potter; M. Eastwood and J. Sawon; M.A. Guest; N.J. Hitchin and J.Seade.

Algebraic Geometry

Author: Robin Hartshorne
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1475738498
Format: PDF, Mobi
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An introduction to abstract algebraic geometry, with the only prerequisites being results from commutative algebra, which are stated as needed, and some elementary topology. More than 400 exercises distributed throughout the book offer specific examples as well as more specialised topics not treated in the main text, while three appendices present brief accounts of some areas of current research. This book can thus be used as textbook for an introductory course in algebraic geometry following a basic graduate course in algebra. Robin Hartshorne studied algebraic geometry with Oscar Zariski and David Mumford at Harvard, and with J.-P. Serre and A. Grothendieck in Paris. He is the author of "Residues and Duality", "Foundations of Projective Geometry", "Ample Subvarieties of Algebraic Varieties", and numerous research titles.

Metric Structures in Differential Geometry

Author: Gerard Walschap
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 0387218262
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book offers an introduction to the theory of differentiable manifolds and fiber bundles. It examines bundles from the point of view of metric differential geometry: Euclidean bundles, Riemannian connections, curvature, and Chern-Weil theory are discussed, including the Pontrjagin, Euler, and Chern characteristic classes of a vector bundle. These concepts are illustrated in detail for bundles over spheres.

Classical Topology and Combinatorial Group Theory

Author: John Stillwell
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461243726
Format: PDF, ePub
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In recent years, many students have been introduced to topology in high school mathematics. Having met the Mobius band, the seven bridges of Konigsberg, Euler's polyhedron formula, and knots, the student is led to expect that these picturesque ideas will come to full flower in university topology courses. What a disappointment "undergraduate topology" proves to be! In most institutions it is either a service course for analysts, on abstract spaces, or else an introduction to homological algebra in which the only geometric activity is the completion of commutative diagrams. Pictures are kept to a minimum, and at the end the student still does nr~ understand the simplest topological facts, such as the rcason why knots exist. In my opinion, a well-balanced introduction to topology should stress its intuitive geometric aspect, while admitting the legitimate interest that analysts and algebraists have in the subject. At any rate, this is the aim of the present book. In support of this view, I have followed the historical development where practicable, since it clearly shows the influence of geometric thought at all stages. This is not to claim that topology received its main impetus from geometric recreations like the seven bridges; rather, it resulted from the l'isualization of problems from other parts of mathematics-complex analysis (Riemann), mechanics (Poincare), and group theory (Dehn). It is these connec tions to other parts of mathematics which make topology an important as well as a beautiful subject.