Tottenville

Author: Barnett Shepherd
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780615342948
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Tottenville is located on the south-western tip of Staten Island and is the southernmost point in New York City and New York State. Far from the urban culture of Manhattan, Tottenville boasts a feeling of independence and isolation. The village of Tottenville came into being around 1840. Its economy and culture arose from oyster fishing, shipbuilding and ship repair, and agriculture. Its trade routes with New Jersey and New York City linked it to the metropolitan region and the greater world. It became the largest town in Westfield, the historic name for this quarter of State Island. Even today, although a part of New York City, and encroached upon by modern suburban culture, the feeling of a small coastal town prevails with characteristics unlike any other place on Staten Island. This book documents the activities of the people who created Tottenville and caused it to flourish.

Tottenville

Author:
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738574066
Format: PDF
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Tottenville, located at the southernmost point in New York State, has long been considered the forgotten town in the forgotten borough of New York City. The area was first populated in the 1600s by the Lenni Lenape Indians who summered on its shores, assured of a bountiful harvest from the sea. Bordered on three sides by water, the town had its roots in the oyster fishing, shipbuilding, and ship repair industries and grew rapidly. The Verrazano Bridge, opened in the 1960s, connected Staten Island to Brooklyn and caused a building boom island-wide. Despite the tremendous growth in population, Tottenville retains its small-town feel and offers residents an oasis from big city life in the form of a welcoming and tight-knit community.

Green Wood Cemetery

Author: Alexandra Kathryn Mosca
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738556505
Format: PDF, ePub
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For generations, Green-Wood Cemetery has played an integral part in New York City's cultural history, serving as a gathering place and a cultural repository. Situated in the historic borough of Brooklyn, the thousands of graves and mausoleums within the cemetery's 478 acres are tangible links and reminders to key events and people who made New York City and America what it is today. The monuments read like a who's who of American greatness and include the names of Leonard Bernstein, F. A. O. Schwarz, Charles L. Tiffany, Samuel Morse, and DeWitt Clinton, among others. A national historic landmark since 2006, Green-Wood is considered one of the preeminent cemeteries in the country and is a living display of the evolving funeral traditions of the city and America as a whole. The cemetery was and remains one of the city's largest open green spaces and a century ago was a social venue for picnics, outings, and political events. Through vintage photographs, Green-Wood Cemetery chronicles the cemetery's rich history and documents how its tradition as a park and a popular tourist attraction continues, drawing 300,000 visitors annually.

Murder Mayhem on Staten Island

Author: Patricia M. Salmon
Publisher: History Press Library Editions
ISBN: 9781540222701
Format: PDF
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"Discover the most fascinating and historic murders in Staten Island's past"--

Roosevelt Island

Author: Judith Berdy
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738512389
Format: PDF
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Roosevelt Island captures the fascinating and sometimes curious history of an island located halfway between Manhattan and Queens in the East River. In 1824, the city of New York purchased Blackwell's Island, later Welfare Island, as a site for its lunatic asylum, penitentiary, workhouses, and almshouses. In the years that followed, the island was a temporary home for several of New York City's famous and infamous. William Marcy Tweed, better known as "Boss Tweed," was imprisoned at the penitentiary in the 1870s. Mae West was incarcerated in 1927 at the Workhouse for Women after her appearance in a play called Sex. After many institutions were closed or relocated, Welfare Island was virtually ignored until 1973, when it was reborn as Roosevelt Island, which is now a model planned community and thriving home to almost ten thousand people.

Staten Island s Greek Community

Author: Christine Victoria Charitis
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738538686
Format: PDF, Docs
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In the early part of the 20th century, Staten Island experienced an influx of Greek immigrants drawn to America by the promise of abundant opportunities. They settled in the farms of New Springville and Bulls Head and in the busy life of Port Richmond. Staten Island's Greek Community highlights traditional aspects of Greek culture and exults in the Americanization, accomplishments, and contributions of this group. The historic images in this book capture familiar scenes such as Greek farms and roadside stands overflowing with succulent vegetables, truck farmers venturing into Manhattan to bring their produce to the Washington Market, and the Candy Kitchen in Port Richmond.

Philadelphia s Rittenhouse Square

Author: Robert Morris Skaler
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738557434
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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During the Gilded Age, Rittenhouse Square was home to Philadelphia's high society, with more millionaires per square foot than any other American neighborhood except New York's Fifth Avenue. Established by William Penn in 1682 as the South-West Square and renamed after astronomer David Rittenhouse in 1825, Rittenhouse Square and its environs changed from an isolated district of brickyards and workers' shanties into the city's most elegant and elite neighborhood between 1845 and 1865. The brownstone and marble mansions on the square itself were inhabited by the city's wealthiest and most prestigious families, with names like Biddle, Cassatt, Drexel, Stotesbury, and Van Rensselaer. As Philadelphia's upper classes fled to the suburbs in the early 20th century, their mansions were replaced by skyscrapers or taken over by cultural institutions like the Philadelphia Art Alliance and the Curtis Institute of Music. While only a few original residences remain on Rittenhouse Square, it is still the center of a lively upscale neighborhood.

Forgotten Ellis Island

Author: Lorie Conway
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062046195
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A century ago, in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty, one of the world's greatest public hospitals was built. Massive and modern, the hospital's twenty-two state-of-the-art buildings were crammed onto two small islands, man-made from the rock and dirt excavated during the building of the New York subway. As America's first line of defense against immigrant-borne disease, the hospital was where the germs of the world converged. The Ellis Island hospital was at once welcoming and foreboding—a fateful crossroad for hundreds of thousands of hopeful immigrants. Those nursed to health were allowed entry to America. Those deemed feeble of body or mind were deported. Three short decades after it opened, the Ellis Island hospital was all but abandoned. As America after World War I began shutting its border to all but a favored few, the hospital fell into disuse and decay, its medical wards left open only to the salt air of the New York Harbor. With many never-before-published photographs and compelling, sometimes heartbreaking stories of patients (a few of whom are still alive today) and medical staff, Forgotten Ellis Island is the first book about this extraordinary institution. It is a powerful tribute to the best and worst of America's dealings with its new citizens-to-be.