Tournaments of Value

Author: Anne Meneley
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1487521324
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A significant contribution to our understanding of the varied experience of women in the Islamic Middle East, Tournaments of Value gives a careful description of a world of female socializing, and the velocity, energy, and elaborateness of this remarkable female social world. Meneley's data challenges assumptions about the cross-cultural validity of a division between household and community, between domestic and public domains. She demonstrates the fluidity of social life, the shifting nature of community organization, and in doing so provides a welcome counterpoint to more rigid formulations of Middle Eastern social structure usually expressed in ethnographies. Tournaments of Value incorporates vignettes to illustrate more analytical points and to enliven the text, allowing the reader to enter fully into the rich world of Zabid in Yemen. This expanded 20th anniversary edition introduces this seminal work on Middle Eastern ethnography and women's studies to a new generation of readers.

Russian Talk

Author: Nancy Ries
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801484162
Format: PDF, ePub
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Soulful, theatrical, intense: Russian talk is notably full of existential musing and dark passion. However, despite the widespread appreciation of Russian talk, no one has analyzed it as a form of cultural performance. As one of the first Western ethnographers to undertake fieldwork in Moscow, Nancy Ries did just that. In this pioneering study, she shows how everyday conversation shapes Russian identity and culture.Dire stories about poverty, hardship, and social decay recited constantly during perestroika served to fabricate a common worldview--conveying a sense of shared experience and destiny, and casting Russian society as an inescapable realm of absurdity and suffering. Ries agues that while these narratives aptly depicted the chaotic events of the time, they also comprised a kind of contemporary folklore, generic in their lamenting, portentous tones and their culturally poignant details.The story of a grandmother who stands in line all day in order to bring home a precious kilo of sugar becomes a parable of feminine self-sacrifice and endurance. Sardonic narratives about frustrated communal apartment dwellers pouring hot pepper in their neighbor's soup pot challenge the myth of camaraderie and express the proverbial notion that revenge is sweeter for Russians than reconciliation.This insightful ethnography suggests the enormous power that ordinary talk has, in any society, to shape social and political attitudes, and to produce distinctive cultural patterns.

Between Marriage and the Market

Author: Homa Hoodfar
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520918863
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Homa Hoodfar's richly detailed ethnography provides a rare glimpse into the daily life of Arab Muslim families. Focusing on the impact of economic liberalization policies from 1983 to 1993, she shows the crucial role of the household in survival strategies among low-income Egyptians. Hoodfar, an Iranian Muslim by birth, presents research that undermines many of the stereotypes associated with traditional Muslim women. Their apparent conservatism, she says, is based on rational calculation of the costs and benefits of working within formal and informal labor markets to secure household power. She posits that increasing adherence to Islam and taking up the veil on the part of women has been partially motivated by women's desire to protect and promote their interests both within and beyond households.

The Republic of Love

Author: Martin Stokes
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226775062
Format: PDF, ePub
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At the heart of The Republic of Love are the voices of three musicians—queer nightclub star Zeki Müren, arabesk originator Orhan Gencebay, and pop diva Sezen Aksu—who collectively have dominated mass media in Turkey since the early 1950s. Their fame and ubiquity have made them national icons—but, Martin Stokes here contends, they do not represent the official version of Turkish identity propagated by anthems or flags; instead they evoke a much more intimate and ambivalent conception of Turkishness. Using these three singers as a lens, Stokes examines Turkey’s repressive politics and civil violence as well as its uncommonly vibrant public life in which music, art, literature, sports, and journalism have flourished. However, Stokes’s primary concern is how Müren, Gencebay, and Aksu’s music and careers can be understood in light of theories of cultural intimacy. In particular, he considers their contributions to the development of a Turkish concept of love, analyzing the ways these singers explore the private matters of intimacy, affection, and sentiment on the public stage.

Crossing the Green Line Between the West Bank and Israel

Author: Avram S. Bornstein
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812217933
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Crossing the Green Line Between the West Bank and Israel makes eloquent use of particular Palestinian experiences as the framework for a critique of the way borders work in the modern world.

Number Our Days

Author: Barbara Myerhoff
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671254308
Format: PDF, ePub
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This investigation into the lives of a group of elderly Jews living in Venice, California, establishes correlations between their ethnic heritage and rituals and their acceptance of physical hardship and approaching death

Palestinian Village Histories

Author: Rochelle Davis
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804773133
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book chronicles the local histories written by modern Palestinians about their villages that were destroyed in the 1948 war.

From Equality to Inequality

Author: Csilla Dallos
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442661712
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The egalitarian society once enjoyed by the Lanoh hunter-gatherers of Peninsular Malaysia is quickly changing. Throughout a year of ethnographic fieldwork among the Lanoh, Csilla Dallos studied and interpreted social change in order to better understand the processes leading to inequality and the concurrent development of social complexity within a community. From Equality to Inequality provides rich empirical data on the factors within a community that significantly affect the development of inequality, including the effects of sedentism, integration, leadership competition, self-aggrandizement, marginalization, and feuding kinship groups. In this case study, Dallos argues that in order to understand emerging inequality, anthropologists and social scientists need to revisit current conceptions of politics in small-scale egalitarian societies. Offering a new model of developing social inequality that is congruent with the principles of complexity theory, From Equality to Inequality is a sterling example of how anthropological practice can further our general understanding of human behaviour.

Dimensions of Development

Author: Susan Vincent
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442660716
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Dimensions of Development traces the 'development' of Allpachico, a village in the Peruvian central highlands. Susan Vincent examines four aid projects in the area, each following distinct international trends, that took place between 1984 and 2008 within the context of wider state and global political and economic systems. A unique historical ethnography, Dimensions of Development illustrates how state and NGO projects have drawn Allpachiqueños deeper into capitalism and have brought about challenges to the local political structure, the comunidad campesina. While highlighting the continual reorganization of the local population into new groups, Vincent also reveals why the comunidad remains the group's preferred form of representation.

Kaleidoscopic Odessa

Author: Tanya Richardson
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442692871
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The recent tumult of Ukraine's Orange Revolution and its aftermath has exposed some of the deep political, social, and cultural divisions that run through the former Soviet republic. Examining Odessa, the Black Sea port that was once the Russian Empire's southern window onto Europe, Kaleidoscopic Odessa provides an ethnographic portrait of these overlapping divisions in a city where many residents consider themselves separate and distinct from Ukraine. Exploring the tensions between local and national identities in a post-Soviet setting from the point of view of everyday life, Tanya Richardson argues that Odessans's sense of distinctiveness is both unique and typical of borderland countries such as Ukraine. Kaleidoscopic Odessa provides a detailed account of how local conceptions of imperial cosmopolitanism shaped the city's identity in a newly formed state. Richardson draws on her participation in history lessons, markets, and walking groups to produce an exemplary study of urban ethnography. Ethnographically sophisticated and methodologically innovative, Kaleidoscopic Odessa will interest anthropologists, Slavists, sociologists, historians, and scholars of urban studies.