Toxicants Health and Regulation since 1945

Author: Nathalie Jas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317319699
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The number of substances potentially dangerous to our health and environment is constantly increasing. The papers in this volume examine the concurrent rise of pollutants and the regulations designed to police their use.

The Rockefeller Foundation Public Health and International Diplomacy 1920 1945

Author: Josep L Barona
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317316789
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Based on extensive archival research, this study examines the role of the Rockefeller Foundation and the League of Nations in improving public health during the interwar period. Barona argues that the Foundation applied a model of business efficiency to its ideology of spreading good health, creating a revolution in public health practice.

A Medical History of Skin

Author: Kevin Patrick Siena
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317319532
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Diseases affecting the skin have tended to provoke a response of particular horror in society. This collection of essays uses case studies to chart the medical history of skin from the eighteenth to the twentieth century.

Powerless Science

Author: Soraya Boudia
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781782382362
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In spite of decades of research on toxicants, along with the growing role of scientific expertise in public policy and the unprecedented rise in the number of national and international institutions dealing with environmental health issues, problems surrounding contaminants and their effects on health have never appeared so important, sometimes to the point of appearing insurmountable. This calls for a reconsideration of the roles of scientific knowledge and expertise in the definition and management of toxic issues, which this book seeks to do. It looks at complex historical, social, and political dynamics, made up of public controversies, environmental and health crises, economic interests, and political responses, and demonstrates how and to what extent scientific knowledge about toxicants has been caught between scientific, economic, and political imperatives.

Uncertain Empire

Author: Joel Isaac
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199986665
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Historians have long understood that the notion of "the cold war" is richly metaphorical, if not paradoxical. The conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union was a war that fell ambiguously short of war, an armed truce that produced considerable bloodshed. Yet scholars in the rapidly expanding field of Cold War studies have seldom paused to consider the conceptual and chronological foundations of the idea of the Cold War itself. In Uncertain Empire, a group of leading scholars takes up the challenge of making sense of the idea of the Cold War and its application to the writing of American history. They interrogate the concept from a wide range of disciplinary vantage points--diplomatic history, the history of science, literary criticism, cultural history, and the history of religion--highlighting the diversity of methods and approaches in contemporary Cold War studies. Animating the volume as a whole is a question about the extent to which the Cold War was an American invention. Uncertain Empire brings debates over national, global, and transnational history into focus and offers students of the Cold War a new framework for considering recent developments in the field.

Powerless Science

Author: Soraya Boudia
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782382372
Format: PDF, Docs
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In spite of decades of research on toxicants, along with the growing role of scientific expertise in public policy and the unprecedented rise in the number of national and international institutions dealing with environmental health issues, problems surrounding contaminants and their effects on health have never appeared so important, sometimes to the point of appearing insurmountable. This calls for a reconsideration of the roles of scientific knowledge and expertise in the definition and management of toxic issues, which this book seeks to do. It looks at complex historical, social, and political dynamics, made up of public controversies, environmental and health crises, economic interests, and political responses, and demonstrates how and to what extent scientific knowledge about toxicants has been caught between scientific, economic, and political imperatives.

In the Name of Science

Author: Andrew Goliszek
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1429997931
Format: PDF
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Science, as Andrew Goliszek proves in this compendious, chilling, and eye-opening book, has always had its dark side. Behind the bright promise of life-saving vaccines and life-enhancing technologies lies the true cost of the efforts to develop them. Knowledge has a price; often that price has been human suffering. The ethical limits governing use of the human body in experimentation have been breached, redefined, and breached again---from the moment the first plague-ridden corpse was heaved over the fortifications of a besieged medieval city to the use of cutting-edge gene therapy today. Those limits are in constant need of redefinition, for the goals and the techniques have become both more refined and more secretive. The German and Japanese human experiments of the 1930s and 1940s horrified the world when they came to light. These barbaric exercises in pseudoscience grew out of assumptions of racial superiority. The subjects were deemed subhuman; ordinary guidelines could therefore be suspended. What has happened in the decades since World War II has differed only in degree. Explicitly or implicitly, any organization or government that undertakes or sponsors scientific research applies some measure of human worth. Experimentation rests upon an equation that balances suffering against gain, the good of the collective against the rights of the individual, and the risk of unknown consequences against the rewards of scientific discovery. Everything depends upon who makes that equation. The sobering and gripping accumulation of evidence in this book proves exactly what has been justified in the name of science. The science of "eugenics" justified enforced sterilization. The need to gain an upper hand in the Cold War justified CIA experiments involving mind control and drugs. The desperate race to control nuclear proliferation was used to justify radiation experiments whose effects are still being felt today. Chemical warfare, gene therapy, molecular medicine: These subjects dominate headlines and even direct our government's foreign policy, yet the whole truth about the experimentation behind them has never been made public. Though not a cheering book, In the Name of Science is a crucially important one, and it deserves a wide audience. A biologist by training, Goliszek presents each topic clearly and explains fully its significance and implications. Connecting the history of scientific experimentation through time with the topics that are likely to dominate the future, he has performed an invaluable service. No other book on the market provides the research included here, or presents it with such persuasive force.

Environmental Toxicants

Author: Morton Lippmann
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780471292982
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A comprehensive guide to assessing the health effects of environmental toxicants in nonoccupational settings Now in a second edition, Environmental Toxicants: Human Exposures and Their Health Effects continues to offer a unique perspective on a topic that is usually focused on exposure and effects in industrial settings. Fully revised and expanded, it presents comprehensive, cutting-edge information on the effects of human exposure to selected chemicals and physical agents in nonoccupational environments. Dr. Morton Lippmann assembles expert contributions by leading authorities on each of the twenty-five environmental agents examined, providing a critical review of the accumulated evidence concerning their known or likely impact on human health, especially after long-term exposure. Six new chapters have been added to this edition, discussing ambient particulate matter, chromium, mercury, noise, pesticides, and ultraviolet radiation. Existing chapters have been updated to include the most current information on performing risk assessments for established toxicants-from asbestos and benzene to the sick building syndrome. In the closing chapters, the authors place the discussion in a broader social and scientific context, exploring such issues as individual and community risk, environmental engineering for risk reduction, pulmonary medicine, and lessons learned in the industrial sector. Supplemented with more than 100 illustrations and photographs, and with a view to future research trends, Environmental Toxicants: Human Exposures and Their Health Effects is an indispensable guide for public health officials, industrial hygienists, epidemiologists, and primary care physicians involved in risk assessment and management for exposed individuals and populations.

Eating Nature in Modern Germany

Author: Corinna Treitel
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 131699158X
Format: PDF
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Adolf Hitler was a vegetarian and the Dachau concentration camp had an organic herb garden. Vegetarianism, organic farming, and other such practices have enticed a wide variety of Germans, from socialists, liberals, and radical anti-Semites in the nineteenth century to fascists, communists, and Greens in the twentieth century. Corinna Treitel offers a fascinating new account of how Germans became world leaders in developing more 'natural' ways to eat and farm. Used to conserve nutritional resources with extreme efficiency at times of hunger and to optimize the nation's health at times of nutritional abundance, natural foods and farming belong to the biopolitics of German modernity. Eating Nature in Modern Germany brings together histories of science, medicine, agriculture, the environment, and popular culture to offer the most thorough and historically comprehensive treatment yet of this remarkable story.

The Social Transformation of American Medicine

Author: Paul Starr
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0786725451
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Winner of the 1983 Pulitzer Prize and the Bancroft Prize in American History, this is a landmark history of how the entire American health care system of doctors, hospitals, health plans, and government programs has evolved over the last two centuries. "The definitive social history of the medical profession in America....A monumental achievement."—H. Jack Geiger, M.D., New York Times Book Review