Toxicants Health and Regulation since 1945

Author: Nathalie Jas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317319699
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The number of substances potentially dangerous to our health and environment is constantly increasing. The papers in this volume examine the concurrent rise of pollutants and the regulations designed to police their use.

Toxicants Health and Regulation since 1945

Author: Nathalie Jas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317319699
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
The number of substances potentially dangerous to our health and environment is constantly increasing. The papers in this volume examine the concurrent rise of pollutants and the regulations designed to police their use.

The Rockefeller Foundation Public Health and International Diplomacy 1920 1945

Author: Josep L Barona
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317316789
Format: PDF
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Based on extensive archival research, this study examines the role of the Rockefeller Foundation and the League of Nations in improving public health during the interwar period. Barona argues that the Foundation applied a model of business efficiency to its ideology of spreading good health, creating a revolution in public health practice.

A Medical History of Skin

Author: Kevin Patrick Siena
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317319532
Format: PDF
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Diseases affecting the skin have tended to provoke a response of particular horror in society. This collection of essays uses case studies to chart the medical history of skin from the eighteenth to the twentieth century.

Powerless Science

Author: Soraya Boudia
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781782382362
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In spite of decades of research on toxicants, along with the growing role of scientific expertise in public policy and the unprecedented rise in the number of national and international institutions dealing with environmental health issues, problems surrounding contaminants and their effects on health have never appeared so important, sometimes to the point of appearing insurmountable. This calls for a reconsideration of the roles of scientific knowledge and expertise in the definition and management of toxic issues, which this book seeks to do. It looks at complex historical, social, and political dynamics, made up of public controversies, environmental and health crises, economic interests, and political responses, and demonstrates how and to what extent scientific knowledge about toxicants has been caught between scientific, economic, and political imperatives.

Powerless Science

Author: Soraya Boudia
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782382372
Format: PDF, ePub
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In spite of decades of research on toxicants, along with the growing role of scientific expertise in public policy and the unprecedented rise in the number of national and international institutions dealing with environmental health issues, problems surrounding contaminants and their effects on health have never appeared so important, sometimes to the point of appearing insurmountable. This calls for a reconsideration of the roles of scientific knowledge and expertise in the definition and management of toxic issues, which this book seeks to do. It looks at complex historical, social, and political dynamics, made up of public controversies, environmental and health crises, economic interests, and political responses, and demonstrates how and to what extent scientific knowledge about toxicants has been caught between scientific, economic, and political imperatives.

In the Name of Science

Author: Andrew Goliszek
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1429997931
Format: PDF, ePub
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Science, as Andrew Goliszek proves in this compendious, chilling, and eye-opening book, has always had its dark side. Behind the bright promise of life-saving vaccines and life-enhancing technologies lies the true cost of the efforts to develop them. Knowledge has a price; often that price has been human suffering. The ethical limits governing use of the human body in experimentation have been breached, redefined, and breached again---from the moment the first plague-ridden corpse was heaved over the fortifications of a besieged medieval city to the use of cutting-edge gene therapy today. Those limits are in constant need of redefinition, for the goals and the techniques have become both more refined and more secretive. The German and Japanese human experiments of the 1930s and 1940s horrified the world when they came to light. These barbaric exercises in pseudoscience grew out of assumptions of racial superiority. The subjects were deemed subhuman; ordinary guidelines could therefore be suspended. What has happened in the decades since World War II has differed only in degree. Explicitly or implicitly, any organization or government that undertakes or sponsors scientific research applies some measure of human worth. Experimentation rests upon an equation that balances suffering against gain, the good of the collective against the rights of the individual, and the risk of unknown consequences against the rewards of scientific discovery. Everything depends upon who makes that equation. The sobering and gripping accumulation of evidence in this book proves exactly what has been justified in the name of science. The science of "eugenics" justified enforced sterilization. The need to gain an upper hand in the Cold War justified CIA experiments involving mind control and drugs. The desperate race to control nuclear proliferation was used to justify radiation experiments whose effects are still being felt today. Chemical warfare, gene therapy, molecular medicine: These subjects dominate headlines and even direct our government's foreign policy, yet the whole truth about the experimentation behind them has never been made public. Though not a cheering book, In the Name of Science is a crucially important one, and it deserves a wide audience. A biologist by training, Goliszek presents each topic clearly and explains fully its significance and implications. Connecting the history of scientific experimentation through time with the topics that are likely to dominate the future, he has performed an invaluable service. No other book on the market provides the research included here, or presents it with such persuasive force.

The St Clair River

Author: Michael W. R. Davis
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738582832
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The St. Clair River, separating Michigan from Ontario, is one of the world's greatest natural waterways. The 40-mile strait connects Lake Huron with Lake St. Clair, northeast of Detroit, as a key link in the Great Lakes chain of mid-North America. Effectively, the St. Clair drains Lakes Superior, Lake Michigan, Lake Huron, and their tributaries, pouring billions of gallons of freshwater into the lower Great Lakes over the Niagara Falls and out through the St. Lawrence Seaway to the Atlantic Ocean. Its recorded history dates from the earliest French fur trappers of the 17th century to the ultramodern ocean freighters connecting the world directly with inner America. This photographic record of the St. Clair River relates the common historical experiences of the major communities along the American side of the waterway--from south to north, the St. Clair Flats, Algonac, Marine City, St. Clair, Marysville, and Port Huron.

Health Care for Some

Author: Beatrix Hoffman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226348032
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Examines the divisive issue of universal health care in the United States and offers an explanation as to why health care is not considered a right in America, as it is in most other nations.

Therapeutic Revolutions

Author: Martin Halliwell
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813560667
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Therapeutic Revolutions examines the evolving relationship between American medicine, psychiatry, and culture from World War II to the dawn of the 1970s. In this richly layered intellectual history, Martin Halliwell ranges from national politics, public reports, and healthcare debates to the ways in which film, literature, and the mass media provided cultural channels for shaping and challenging preconceptions about health and illness. Beginning with a discussion of the profound impact of World War II and the Cold War on mental health, Halliwell moves from the influence of work, family, and growing up in the Eisenhower years to the critique of institutional practice and the search for alternative therapeutic communities during the 1960s. Blending a discussion of such influential postwar thinkers as Erich Fromm, William Menninger, Erving Goffman, Erik Erikson, and Herbert Marcuse with perceptive readings of a range of cultural text that illuminate mental health issues--among them Spellbound, Shock Corridor, Revolutionary Road, and I Never Promised You a Rose Garden--this compelling study argues that the postwar therapeutic revolutions closely interlink contrasting discourses of authority and liberation.