Transitions to the Bronze Age Interregional Interaction and Socio Cultural Change in the Third Millennium BC Carpathian Basin and Neighbouring Regions

Author: Volker Heyd
Publisher:
ISBN: 9789639911482
Format: PDF, ePub
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The meetings of the most significant archaeological association of Europe, the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA), provide each year an outstanding opportunity for dialogues between scholars of various countries and backgrounds. At the 16th meeting, held in September 2010 in The Hague, The Netherlands, Volker Heyd, Gabriella Kulcsar and Vajk Szeverenyi organized a full-day conference session focusing on interregional contacts and social, economic and cultural change in the third millennium BC in and around the Carpathian Basin. This book was prepared based on the papers given at this session. The 13 articles of this volume, all written in English, discuss problems of transition and change from the Late Copper to the Early Bronze Age, that is more than a millennium from the later 4th to the end of the 3rd millennium BC. The book highlights temporal and spatial dynamics in the interregional interactions and communication networks among various societies of that period. Traditional typo-chronological approaches are supplemented by the results of absolute dating, anthropological and biochemical investigations and statistical analyses. Also new finds and materials are presented and new perspectives offered. The publication of the volume will certainly promote communication between the archaeological schools of western and east Central Europe, providing new aspects for future research as well. It will likewise contribute a great deal to our knowledge about the Carpathian Basin in the third millennium BC so important in bridging the prehistoric east and southeast to the west of the Continent.

Blood of the Celts The New Ancestral Story

Author: Jean Manco
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
ISBN: 0500772967
Format: PDF, Mobi
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From prehistory to the present day, an unrivaled look deep into the contentious origins of the Celts Blood of the Celts brings together genetic, archaeological, and linguistic evidence to address the often-debated question: who were the Celts? What peoples or cultural identities should that term describe? And did they in fact inhabit the British Isles before the Romans arrived? Author Jean Manco challenges existing accounts of the origins of the Celts, providing a new analysis that draws on the latest discoveries as well as ancient history. In a novel approach, the book opens with a discussion of early medieval Irish and British texts, allowing the Celts to speak in their own words and voices. It then traces their story back in time into prehistory to their deepest origins and their ancestors, before bringing the narrative forward to the present day. Each chapter also has a useful summary in bullet points to aid the reader and highlight the key facts in the story.

History of Humanity From the third millennium to the seventh century B C

Author: Sigfried J. de Laet
Publisher: UNESCO
ISBN: 9789231028113
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The second volume covers the first two and a half thousand years of recorded history, from the start of the Bronze Age 5,000 years ago to the beginnings of the Iron Age. Written by a team of over sixty specialists, this volume includes a comprehensive bibliography and a detailed index.

Population Dynamics in Prehistory and Early History

Author: Elke Kaiser
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 311026630X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The state of migration research has undergone rapid change since methods of analysis involving stable and radiogen isotopes and molecular genetics have started to be applied. At a conference held in Berlin in March 2010, groups whose research looks at population dynamics in pre and early, or in more recent history presented their insights about methodological approaches, research results and perspectives. The aim of this volume is to conduct a dialogue between archaeologists, geneticists and archaeometrists for the purpose of a reconstruction of (pre)historic population history.

From the ground up

Author: Nancy L. Wicker
Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Ltd
ISBN: 9781841710259
Format: PDF, ePub
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A series of papers from the Proceedings of the Fifth Gender and Archaeology Conference held at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, October 1998. These explore recent research in gender: gender theory, gender in archaeology and anthropology, and methodological issues. Case studies range from the Mediterranean, to the Americas, Scandinavia and Madagascar, from the third millennium BC to the present day.

The Cambridge Prehistory of the Bronze and Iron Age Mediterranean

Author: A. Bernard Knapp
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 131619406X
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Cambridge Prehistory of the Bronze and Iron Age Mediterranean offers new insights into the material and social practices of many different Mediterranean peoples during the Bronze and Iron Ages, presenting in particular those features that both connect and distinguish them. Contributors discuss in depth a range of topics that motivate and structure Mediterranean archaeology today, including insularity and connectivity; mobility, migration, and colonization; hybridization and cultural encounters; materiality, memory, and identity; community and household; life and death; and ritual and ideology. The volume's broad coverage of different approaches and contemporary archaeological practices will help practitioners of Mediterranean archaeology to move the subject forward in new and dynamic ways. Together, the essays in this volume shed new light on the people, ideas, and materials that make up the world of Mediterranean archaeology today, beyond the borders that separate Europe, Africa, and the Middle East.

The Oxford Handbook of Neolithic Europe

Author: Chris Fowler
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191666890
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Neolithic - a period in which the first sedentary agrarian communities were established across much of Europe - has been a key topic of archaeological research for over a century. However, the variety of evidence across Europe and the way research traditions in different countries (and languages) have developed makes it very difficult for both students and specialists to gain an overview of continent-wide trends. The Oxford Handbook of Neolithic Europe provides the first comprehensive, geographically extensive, thematic overview of the European Neolithic - from Iberia to Russia and from Norway to Malta - offering both a general introduction and a clear exploration of key issues and current debates surrounding evidence and interpretation. Chapters written by leading experts in the field examine topics such as the movement of plants, animals, ideas, and people (including recent trends in the application of genetics and isotope analyses); cultural change (from the first farming to the first metal artefacts); domestic architecture; subsistence; material culture; monuments; and burial and other treatments of the dead. In doing so, the volume also considers the history of research and sets out agendas and themes for future work in the field.

European Societies in the Bronze Age

Author: A. F. Harding
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521367295
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The European Bronze Age, roughly 2500 to 750 BC, was the last fully prehistoric period and crucial to the formation of the Europe emerging in the later first millennium BC. This book provides a detailed account of its material culture, comparing and contrasting evidence from different geographical zones, and drawing out the essential characteristics of the period. It looks at settlement, burial, economy, technology, trade and transport, warfare, and social and religious life. The result is a comprehensive study that will interest specialists and students, and be accessible to non-specialists.

The Lost World of Old Europe

Author: David W. Anthony
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691143880
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In the prehistoric Copper Age, long before cities, writing, or the invention of the wheel, Old Europe was among the most culturally rich regions in the world. Its inhabitants lived in prosperous agricultural towns. The ubiquitous goddess figurines found in their houses and shrines have triggered intense debates about women's roles. The Lost World of Old Europe is the accompanying catalog for an exhibition at New York University's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World. This superb volume features essays by leading archaeologists as well as breathtaking color photographs cataloguing the objects, some illustrated here for the first time. The heart of Old Europe was in the lower Danube valley, in contemporary Bulgaria and Romania. Old European coppersmiths were the most advanced metal artisans in the world. Their intense interest in acquiring copper, Aegean shells, and other rare valuables gave rise to far-reaching trading networks. In their graves, the bodies of Old European chieftains were adorned with pounds of gold and copper ornaments. Their funerals were without parallel in the Near East or Egypt. The exhibition represents the first time these rare objects have appeared in the United States. An unparalleled introduction to Old Europe's cultural, technological, and artistic legacy, The Lost World of Old Europe includes essays by Douglass Bailey, John Chapman, Cornelia-Magda Lazarovici, Ioan Opris and Catalin Bem, Ernst Pernicka, Dragomir Nicolae Popovici, Michel Séfériadès, and Vladimir Slavchev.