Understanding Deaf Culture

Author: Dr. Paddy Ladd
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 1847696899
Format: PDF
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This book presents a ‘Traveller’s Guide’ to Deaf Culture, starting from the premise that Deaf cultures have an important contribution to make to other academic disciplines, and human lives in general. Within and outside Deaf communities, there is a need for an account of the new concept of Deaf culture, which enables readers to assess its place alongside work on other minority cultures and multilingual discourses. The book aims to assess the concepts of culture, on their own terms and in their many guises and to apply these to Deaf communities. The author illustrates the pitfalls which have been created for those communities by the medical concept of ‘deafness’ and contrasts this with his new concept of “Deafhood”, a process by which every Deaf child, family and adult implicitly explains their existence in the world to themselves and each other.

Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Author: Thomas K. Holcomb
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199777543
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Introduction to American Deaf Culture provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Deaf in contemporary hearing society. The book offers an overview of Deaf art, literature, history, and humor, and touches on political, social and cultural themes.

Deaf Culture

Author: Irene W. Leigh
Publisher: Plural Publishing
ISBN: 1597569941
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Theology without Words

Author: Wayne Morris
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317011074
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book is a study of a Christian theology without words, focussing on theology in the Deaf Community. Deaf people's first and preferred method of communication is not English or any other spoken language, but British Sign Language - a language that cannot be written down. Deaf people of faith attend church on a regular basis, profess faith in God and have developed unique approaches to doing theology. While most Western theology is word-centred and is either expressed through or dependent on written texts, theology in the Deaf Community is largely non-written. This book presents and examines some of that theology from the Deaf Community and argues that written texts are not necessary for creative theological debate, a deep spirituality or for ideas about God to develop.

Rethinking Disability Theory and Practice

Author: K. Lesnik-Oberstein
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137456973
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Drawing from work in a wide range of fields, this book presents novel approaches to key debates in thinking about and defining disability. Differing from other works in Critical Disability Studies, it crucially demonstrates the consequences of radically rethinking the roles of language and perspective in constructing identities.

Disability in Local and Global Worlds

Author: Benedicte Ingstad
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520246164
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The lives of many disabled people in Europe and North America have improved over the past two decades through innovative technologies and the efforts of the disability rights movement. These changes have been spreading to other societies around the globe--albeit unevenly. In this collection of essays, leading scholars explore global changes in disability awareness, technology, and policy from the viewpoint of disabled people and their families in a wide range of local contexts. The authors report on ethnographic research in Brazil, Uganda, Botswana, Somalia, Britain, Israel, China, Egypt, India, and Japan. They address the definition of disability, the new eugenics, human rights in local contexts, domestic and state citizenship of disabled people, and issues of identity and belonging.

Inside Deaf Culture

Author: Carol PADDEN
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674041755
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Inside Deaf Culture relates deaf people's search for a voice of their own, and their proud self-discovery and self-description as a flourishing culture. Padden and Humphries show how the nineteenth-century schools for the deaf, with their denigration of sign language and their insistence on oralist teaching, shaped the lives of deaf people for generations to come. They describe how deaf culture and art thrived in mid-twentieth century deaf clubs and deaf theatre, and profile controversial contemporary technologies." Cf. Publisher's description.

The Deaf Way

Author: Bruce N. Snider
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563680267
Format: PDF
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Selected papers from the conference held in Washington DC, July 9-14, 1989.

Psychotherapy with Deaf Clients from Diverse Groups

Author: Irene Leigh
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563680830
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Using the premise that deaf people often are a minority within a minority, 27 outstanding experts outline in this timely volume approaches to intervention with clients from specific, diverse populations. With an overview on being a psychotherapist with deaf clients, this guide includes information on the diversity of consumer knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and experiences.