Understanding Immigration Law

Author: Kevin R. Johnson
Publisher: LexisNexis
ISBN: 1422486397
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Understanding Immigration Law lays out the basics of U.S. immigration law in an accessible way to newcomers to the field. It offers background about the intellectual, historical, and constitutional foundations of U.S. immigration law. The book also identifies the factors that have historically fueled migration to the United States, including the economic "pull" of jobs and family in the United States and the "push" of economic hardship, political instability, and other facts of life in the sending country. In the middle chapters, the authors provide a capsule summary of the law concerning the admissions and removal procedures and criteria in the Immigration and Nationality Act. The book ends with a chapter speculating about the future of U.S. immigration law and the challenges and opportunities facing the nation. This book provides a comprehensive overview of U.S. immigration law. It has been designed to supplement the most widely adopted immigration law casebooks. The co-authors of Understanding Immigration Law provide up-to-date immigration law news and analysis on the ImmigrationProf blog, which can be used to ensure that teachers and students are up-to-date on recent developments in immigration law.

Understanding Immigration Law and Practice

Author: Ayodele Gansallo
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
ISBN: 1454850388
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Understanding Immigration Law and Practice offers a thorough, accessible, and practical approach to understanding and putting to use U.S. laws and regulations to help protect refugees, bring needed workers to the U.S, and reunite families. Attuned to the sensitivity and responsibility necessary to ensuring just results in high stakes immigration cases, the authors provide readers with in-depth, information and freely offer their knowledge and insights into the complex legal issues faced by immigration clients, while proposing strategies for the professionals seeking to help them. Key Features: Authors with more than twenty-five years combined front-line experience. Compact, accessible coverage of complex fluctuating U.S. immigration law and regulations, including: Nonimmigrant visas, including B-1/B-2, H-1Bs, and visas for investment and trade. Immigration for humanitarian immigrants: asylum seekers, refugees, and SIJ, U, and T visa applicants. Permanent Labor Certification Program (PERM). Lawful permanent resident applications based on family relationships, employment, and investment, including adjustment of status and consular processing. Grounds of inadmissibility, deportation, and immigration court removal processes, including waivers. Naturalization and citizenship eligibility. Balanced coverage of statutory and procedural rules with practical insights to aid in problem solving. Numerous cases for discussion, with responses on the companion website to encourage student participation and retention. Frequent vivid examples and cases from real life to assist readers in translating legal rules and theory into practice. Tools for student success, including learning objectives, marginal notes on key terms, and many documents and illustrations from actual practice. A chapter on managing the immigration practice, including performing case assessment and interviewing.

Immigration Law and Social Justice

Author: Bill Ong Hing
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
ISBN: 1454892625
Format: PDF, ePub
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This first edition casebook approaches immigration law and policy from a public interest perspective with a special emphasis on issues of social justice. Along with cases and statutory material, Immigration Law and Social Justice also employs a wide variety of materials from appellate cases, client examples, article excerpts, and hypotheticals. These materials not only provide the basic framework for immigration law, but also engage students with the greater social, political, and economic context necessary to understand the movement of immigrants to the United States, as well as the human impact of enforcement and administration of the immigration laws. Key Features: Background on the social context of immigration law and its enforcement while engaged in a sophisticated examination of the technicalities of the relevant statutory and administrative law. Learning the relevant law with an eye toward potential advocacy, including litigation strategies. Allowing students to critically evaluate the mutually constitutive work of race and immigration law. Having contextual background to understand immigration and immigration enforcement. A unique focus on immigration and social justice, as well as public interest immigration lawyering.

Understanding Immigration

Author: Marilyn Hoskin
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438466870
Format: PDF, ePub
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Undergraduate-level textbook introducing students to the factors which define immigration politics in the United States and Europe. Based on the dual premise that nations need to learn from how immigration issues are handled in other modern democracies, and that adaptation to a new era of refugee and emigration movements is critical to a stable world, Marilyn Hoskin systematically compares the immigration policies of the United States, Britain, Germany, and France as prime examples of the challenges faced in the twenty-first century. Because immigration is a complex phenomenon, Understanding Immigration provides students with a multidisciplinary framework based on the thesis that a nation’s geography, history, economy, and political system define its immigration policy. In the process, it is possible to weigh the influence of such factors as isolation, colonialism, labor imbalances, and tolerance of fringe parties and groups in determining how governments ultimately respond to both routine immigration requests and the more dramatic surges witnessed in both Europe and the United States since 2013.

Justice and Authority in Immigration Law

Author: Colin Grey
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1782258922
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book provides a new and powerful account of the demands of justice on immigration law and policy. Drawing principally on the work of Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, and John Rawls, it argues that justice requires states to give priority of admission to the most disadvantaged migrants, and to grant some form of citizenship or non-oppressive status to those migrants who become integrated. It also argues that states must avoid policies of admission and exclusion that can only be implemented through unjust means. It therefore refutes the common misconception that justice places no limits on the discretion of states to control immigration.

Immigration Law

Author: Jamie Chai Yun Liew
Publisher: Essentials of Canadian Law
ISBN: 9781552213926
Format: PDF
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This book builds upon the first edition as an introductory guide to immigration, refugee, and citizenship law. Its aim is to provide an overview, or a starting point, both for those who want to investigate the mechanics of Canada's immigration regime and for those who want to assess, critique, or question the aims and impacts of the law.

Immigration Law 2015

Author: Kevin Browne
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781910019856
Format: PDF, Docs
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Immigration Law is a straightforward, up-to-date and practical introduction to this changing area of law.

Illegal Lives

Author: Angela S. García
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781321890846
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Cities across the U.S. increasingly respond to undocumented immigrants through local law. These locales set parameters of inclusion and exclusion through accommodating measures intended to integrate newcomers and restrictive policies meant to marginalize them. How do the varying legal contexts of receiving locales shape these immigrants' everyday lives and future prospects? In the first comparative study of the outcomes of local immigration law, my dissertation explores the incorporation effects of accommodating and restrictive socio-legal contexts, and it does so from the perspective of undocumented Mexicans. Drawing on multi-sited and mixed methods research, I counter scholars who argue that restrictive policy environments uniformly force immigrants to margins of society. My dissertation demonstrates the unintended social consequences of legal restrictions, wherein aspects of immigrants' settlement, cultural incorporation, and political socialization flourish in response to the very laws that seek to exclude them. The first empirical chapter asks whether restrictive laws work to push undocumented immigrants out of hostile destinations. To gain leverage on this question, I focus on the relationship between settlement behavior and "attrition through enforcement" policy. Formed to trigger the voluntary exit of undesired immigrants, these laws aim to make their lives exceedingly difficult. With a twofold comparison of undocumented immigrants in three cities and two states, I use original bi-national survey data to demonstrate that such measures do not have a significant effect on the amount of time spent in restrictive locales or changes in place of residency. I draw from interview data collected from undocumented immigrants to argue that economic, social, and life course factors more prominently shape settlement decisions. Within the second chapter, I explore undocumented immigrants' navigation of daily life in cities with hostile socio-legal environments. How do every day events, like going to work and taking children to school, unfold for undocumented immigrants living legally restrictive cities, and how does this relate to incorporation trajectories? Drawing on observations and interviews, I find that undocumented Mexicans in restrictive destinations attempt legal passing, or the public embodiment of the culture of the dominant core population, a behavior not present in accommodating locales. Purposive and strategic, this daily effort to pass is primarily a protective strategy, yet over time it becomes internalized and contributes to incremental cultural incorporation. The final empirical chapter focuses on political engagement in restrictive and accommodating receiving locales. With observational and interview data from undocumented immigrants, I demonstrate that restrictive laws---while clearly contributing to social suffering---also trigger political socialization. Seeking to understand the implications of legal restrictions, immigrants forge closer ties with neighbors, sympathetic allies, and advocacy organizations and, in doing so, they develop political knowledge. Nevertheless, the oppressive nature of restrictive socio-legal contexts dampens political efficacy and limits political participation to the realm of local immigration policy. Conversely, accommodating laws make the everyday activities of undocumented immigrants far more secure and stable. Freed from the daily burden of restrictive immigration policy, immigrants in accommodating destinations become more broadly socialized in the local politics, have a higher sense of political efficacy, and participate in a wider range of political issues. The determinants of local immigration laws have been studied, but we know little about their social effects. With fieldwork in multiple sites chosen for their theoretical variation, my dissertation is the first comparative study of the outcomes of local immigration measures for undocumented immigrants themselves. By bringing immigrants into the analysis, I highlight the deep yet often counterintuitive influence of divergent socio-legal contexts. In doing so, the dissertation expands standard explanations of incorporation to include illegality and the socio-legal environments of immigrant destinations as key variables driving the adaptation process. My data also have implications for our understanding of inequality, as local immigration laws create a new axis of stratification that shapes immigrants' everyday lives and future prospects.

The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 c

Author: Gabriel J. Chin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316033570
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Along with the civil rights and voting rights acts, the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 is one of the most important bills of the civil rights era. The Act's political, legal, and demographic impact continues to be felt, yet its legacy is controversial. The 1965 Act was groundbreaking in eliminating the white America immigration policy in place since 1790, ending Asian exclusion, and limiting discrimination against Eastern European Catholics and Jews. At the same time, the Act discriminated against gay men and lesbians, tied refugee status to Cold War political interests, and shattered traditional patterns of Mexican migration, setting the stage for current immigration politics. Drawing from studies in law, political science, anthropology, and economics, this book will be an essential tool for any scholar or student interested in immigration law.