A Fight for the Soul of Public Education

Author: Steven K. Ashby
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501706489
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In reaction to the changes imposed on public schools across the country in the name of "education reform," the Chicago Teachers Union redefined its traditional role and waged a multidimensional fight that produced a community-wide school strike and transformed the scope of collective bargaining into arenas that few labor relations experts thought possible. Using interviews, first-person accounts, participant observation, union documents, and media reports, Steven K. Ashby and Robert Bruno tell the story of the 2012 strike that shut down the Chicago school system for seven days. A Fight for the Soul of Public Education takes into account two overlapping, parallel, and equally important stories. One is a grassroots story of worker activism told from the perspective of rank-and-file union members and their community supporters. Ashby and Bruno provide a detailed account of how the strike became an international cause when other teachers unions had largely surrendered to corporate-driven education reform. The second story describes the role of state and national politics in imposing educational governance changes on public schools and draconian limitations on union bargaining rights. It includes a detailed account of the actual bargaining process revealing the mundane and the transcendental strategies of both school board and union representatives.

The Chicago School of Architecture

Author: Carl W. Condit
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226114552
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Discusses the materials and structural techniques of this period in relation to the economic and cultural growth of Chicago and analyzes the school's role in the development of modern architecture

Music in Renaissance Magic

Author: Gary Tomlinson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226807928
Format: PDF, ePub
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Magic enjoyed a vigorous revival in sixteenth-century Europe, attaining a prestige lost for over a millennium and becoming, for some, a kind of universal philosophy. Renaissance music also suggested a form of universal knowledge through renewed interest in two ancient themes: the Pythagorean and Platonic "harmony of the celestial spheres" and the legendary effects of the music of bards like Orpheus, Arion, and David. In this climate, Renaissance philosophers drew many new and provocative connections between music and the occult sciences. In Music in Renaissance Magic, Gary Tomlinson describes some of these connections and offers a fresh view of the development of early modern thought in Italy. Raising issues essential to postmodern historiography—issues of cultural distance and our relationship to the others who inhabit our constructions of the past —Tomlinson provides a rich store of ideas for students of early modern culture, for musicologists, and for historians of philosophy, science, and religion. "A scholarly step toward a goal that many composers have aimed for: to rescue the idea of New Age Music—that music can promote spiritual well-being—from the New Ageists who have reduced it to a level of sonic wallpaper."—Kyle Gann, Village Voice "An exemplary piece of musical and intellectual history, of interest to all students of the Renaissance as well as musicologists. . . . The author deserves congratulations for introducing this new approach to the study of Renaissance music."—Peter Burke, NOTES "Gary Tomlinson's Music in Renaissance Magic: Toward a Historiography of Others examines the 'otherness' of magical cosmology. . . . [A] passionate, eloquently melancholy, and important book."—Anne Lake Prescott, Studies in English Literature

Subcultures Popular Music and Social Change

Author: The Subcultures Network
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443867373
Format: PDF, Docs
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Style-based subcultures, scenes and tribes have pulsated through the history of social, economic and political change. From 1940s zoot-suiters and hepcats; through 1950s rock ’n’ rollers, beatniks and Teddy boys; 1960s surfers, rudeboys, mods, hippies and bikers; 1970s skinheads, soul boys, rastas, glam rockers, funksters and punks; on to the heavy metal, hip-hop, casual, goth, rave, hipster and clubber styles of the 1980s, 90s, noughties and beyond; distinctive blends of fashion and music have become a defining feature of the cultural landscape. Research into these phenomena has traversed the social sciences and humanities, and Subcultures, Popular Music and Social Change assembles important theoretical interventions and empirical studies from this rich, interdisciplinary field. Featuring contributions from major scholars and new researchers, the book explores the historical and cultural significance of subcultural styles and their related music genres. Particular attention is given to the relation between subcultures and their historical context, the place of subcultures within patterns of cultural and political change, and their meaning for participants, confederates and opponents. As well as Anglo-American developments, the book considers experiences across a variety of global sites and locales, giving reference to issues such as class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, creativity, commerce, identity, resistance and deviance.

A Passion for Souls

Author: Lyle W. Dorsett
Publisher: Moody Publishers
ISBN: 9780802480699
Format: PDF
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Dwight Lyman Moody was the greatest evangelist of the 19th century. In the pre-television era, he traveled more than one million miles to preach the gospel to more than 100 million people. Although equipped with just four years of formal schooling, Moody launched ministries in education and publishing that remain vital and fruitful today. Moody had a passion for souls. Yet with all of his accomplishments for God, D. L. Moody remained a humble man. His greatest riches were found in the love of his Lord and the souls that had been changed for the glory of God. In these pages, today's believers will find a model of biblical passion, vision, and commitment. Lyle Dorsett reveals the heart of this great evangelist, recounting his life and realistically probing his strengths, weaknesses, virtues, faults, triumphs, struggles and motivations to find a man after God's own heart. The Deluxe Leather Collector's Edition is perfect for people any age.

Sacred Pain

Author: Ariel Glucklich
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199839492
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Why would anyone seek out the very experience the rest of us most wish to avoid? Why would religious worshipers flog or crucify themselves, sleep on spikes, hang suspended by their flesh, or walk for miles through scorching deserts with bare and bloodied feet? In this insightful new book, Ariel Glucklich argues that the experience of ritual pain, far from being a form of a madness or superstition, contains a hidden rationality and can bring about a profound transformation of the consciousness and identity of the spiritual seeker. Steering a course between purely cultural and purely biological explanations, Glucklich approaches sacred pain from the perspective of the practitioner to fully examine the psychological and spiritual effects of self-hurting. He discusses the scientific understanding of pain, drawing on research in fields such as neuropsychology and neurology. He also ranges over a broad spectrum of historical and cultural contexts, showing the many ways mystics, saints, pilgrims, mourners, shamans, Taoists, Muslims, Hindus, Native Americans, and indeed members of virtually every religion have used pain to achieve a greater identification with God. He examines how pain has served as a punishment for sin, a cure for disease, a weapon against the body and its desires, or a means by which the ego may be transcended and spiritual sickness healed. "When pain transgresses the limits," the Muslim mystic Mizra Asadullah Ghalib is quoted as saying, "it becomes medicine." Based on extensive research and written with both empathy and critical insight, Sacred Pain explores the uncharted inner terrain of self-hurting and reveals how meaningful suffering has been used to heal the human spirit.

The Chicago Pragmatists and American Progressivism

Author: Andrew Feffer
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801425028
Format: PDF, Docs
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Founded in 1894 at a peak of social and industrial turmoil, the Chicago school of pragmatist philosophy is emblematic of the progressive spirit of early twentieth-century America. The Chicago pragmatists under the leadership of John Dewey pursued a close critique of the modern workplace, school, and neighborhood which provided a theoretical base for the progressive reform agenda. Andrew Feffer here provides a richly textured group portrait of Dewey and his colleagues George Herbert Mead and James Hayden Tufts against the backdrop of Chicago's social history. In this nuanced intellectual biography of the Chicago pragmatists, Feffer retraces the story of their personal involvement in reform movements and examines how they revised contemporary political rhetoric and social theory in order to reestablish the foundations of democracy in productive and rewarding work. Drawing on liberal Christian reformist as well as philosophical idealist traditions, the pragmatists advanced a radically humanistic social theory that attacked the regimentation of factory life and demanded the democratization of industry and education. At the center of this progressive philosophy was the elimination of social divisions including the fundamental rift between intellectual and manual labor. Feffer also gives an account of certain elitist and anti-democratic assumptions of pragmatist theory; he shows, in particular, how progressive reformers inherited the pragmatists' mistrust of the political impulses of the industrial workers they championed. Linking a major current in American thought to the history of industrial relations, The Chicago Pragmatists and American Progressivism contributes to current debates in intellectual history, labor history, political theory, and American studies.

Der Staat

Author: Platon
Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand
ISBN: 3843030944
Format: PDF
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Platon: Der Staat Entstanden etwa in der Mitte der siebziger Jahre des 4. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. Erstdruck (in lateinischer Übersetzung durch Marsilio Ficino) in: Opera, Florenz o. J. (ca. 1482/84). Erstdruck des griechischen Originals in: Hapanta ta tu Platônos, herausgegeben von M. Musuros, Venedig 1513. Erste deutsche Übersetzung (in Auszügen) durch G. Lauterbeck unter dem Titel »Summa der Platonischen Lere, von den Gesetzen und Regierung des gemeinen Nutzes« in: G. Lauterbeck, Regentenbuch, Leipzig 1572. Erste vollständige deutsche Übersetzung durch Johann Friedrich Kleuker unter dem Titel »Die Republik oder ein Gespräch über das Gerechte« in: Werke, 2. Band, Lemgo 1780. Der Text folgt der Übersetzung durch Wilhelm Siegmund Teuffel (Buch I-V) und Wilhelm Wiegand (Buch VI-X) von 1855/56. Vollständige Neuausgabe mit einer Biographie des Autors. Herausgegeben von Karl-Maria Guth. Berlin 2013. Textgrundlage ist die Ausgabe: Platon: Sämtliche Werke. Berlin: Lambert Schneider, [1940]. Die Paginierung obiger Ausgabe wird in dieser Neuausgabe als Marginalie zeilengenau mitgeführt. Umschlaggestaltung von Thomas Schultz-Overhage unter Verwendung des Bildes: Raffael, Die Schule von Athen (Detail). Gesetzt aus Minion Pro, 11 pt.