Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War

Author: Tom Moore Craig
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 1611171105
Format: PDF, ePub
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Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War chronicles the lives and concerns of the Anderson, Brockman, and Moore families of piedmont South Carolina during the late-antebellum and Civil War eras through 124 letters dated 1853 to 1865. The letters provide valuable firsthand accounts of evolving attitudes toward the war as conveyed between battlefronts and the home front, and they also express rich details about daily life in both environments. As the men of service age from each family join the Confederate ranks and write from military camps in Virginia and the Carolinas, they describe combat in some of the war's more significant battles. Though the surviving combatants remain staunch patriots to the Southern cause until the bitter end, readers witness in their letters the waning of initial enthusiasm in the face of the realities of warfare. The corresponding letters from the home front offer a more pragmatic assessment of the period and its hardships. Emblematic of the fates of many Southern families, the experiences of these representative South Carolinians are dramatically illustrated in their letters from the eve of the Civil War through its conclusion.

Living a Big War in a Small Place

Author: Philip N. Racine
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 1611172985
Format: PDF
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Most of what we know about how the Civil War affected life in the Confederacy is related to cities, troop movements, battles, and prominent political, economic, or military leaders. Far less is known about the people who lived in small Southern towns remote from marching armies or battles. Philip N. Racine explores life in one such place—Spartanburg, South Carolina—in an effort to reshape the contours of that great conflict. By 1864 life in most of the Confederacy, but especially in rural towns, was characterized by scarcity, high prices, uncertainty, fear, and bad-tempered neighbors. Shortages of food were common. People lived with constant anxiety that a soldiering father or son would be killed or wounded. Taxes were high, inflation was rampant, good news was scarce and seemed to always be followed by bad. The slave population was growing restive as their masters’ bad news was their good news. Army deserters were threatening lawlessness; accusations and vindictiveness colored the atmosphere and added to the anxiety, fear, and feeling of helplessness. Often people blamed their troubles on the Confederate government in faraway Richmond, Virginia. Racine provides insight into these events through personal stories: the plight of a slave; the struggles of a war widow managing her husband’s farm, ten slaves, and seven children; and the trauma of a lowcountry refugee’s having to forfeit a wealthy, aristocratic way of life and being thrust into relative poverty and an alien social world. All were part of the complexity of wartime Spartanburg District.

Veterans North and South The Transition from Soldier to Civilian after the American Civil War

Author: Paul A. Cimbala
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 031303821X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Based largely on Civil War veterans' own words, this book documents how many of these men survived the extraordinary horrors and hardships of war with surprising resilience and went on to become productive members of their communities in their post-war lives. • Documents how Civil War veterans' combat experience changed them in ways that allowed them to become productive members of their communities and leaders in their sections—a largely overlooked "benefit" to the war • Identifies overarching trends among veterans' experiences while also underscoring how varied Civil War soldiers' experiences were, depending on which side they fought for, where they fought, and their socioeconomic status

War Stuff

Author: Joan E. Cashin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108351980
Format: PDF
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In this path-breaking work on the American Civil War, Joan E. Cashin explores the struggle between armies and civilians over the human and material resources necessary to wage war. This war 'stuff' included the skills of white Southern civilians, as well as such material resources as food, timber, and housing. At first, civilians were willing to help Confederate or Union forces, but the war took such a toll that all civilians, regardless of politics, began focusing on their own survival. Both armies took whatever they needed from human beings and the material world, which eventually destroyed the region's ability to wage war. In this fierce contest between civilians and armies, the civilian population lost. Cashin draws on a wide range of documents, as well as the perspectives of environmental history and material culture studies. This book provides an entirely new perspective on the war era.

Mississippi s Civil War

Author: Ben Wynne
Publisher: Mercer University Press
ISBN: 9780881460391
Format: PDF
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An examination of Mississippi's Civil War experience in a social, political and military context, this book begins with an introductory overview of the pre-war socio-political climate of the state and ends with a treatment of Mississippi's post-war environment and the rise of Lost Cause mythology, covering pivotal events, issues, and personalities of the period and revealing the experiences of Mississippians as they struggled to deal with the crisis.

The Politics of Taste in Antebellum Charleston

Author: Maurie D. McInnis
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469625997
Format: PDF, Mobi
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At the close of the American Revolution, Charleston, South Carolina, was the wealthiest city in the new nation, with the highest per-capita wealth among whites and the largest number of enslaved residents. Maurie D. McInnis explores the social, political, and material culture of the city to learn how--and at what human cost--Charleston came to be regarded as one of the most refined cities in antebellum America. While other cities embraced a culture of democracy and egalitarianism, wealthy Charlestonians cherished English notions of aristocracy and refinement, defending slavery as a social good and encouraging the growth of southern nationalism. Members of the city's merchant-planter class held tight to the belief that the clothes they wore, the manners they adopted, and the ways they designed house lots and laid out city streets helped secure their place in social hierarchies of class and race. This pursuit of refinement, McInnis demonstrates, was bound up with their determined efforts to control the city's African American majority. She then examines slave dress, mobility, work spaces, and leisure activities to understand how Charleston slaves negotiated their lives among the whites they served. The textures of lives lived in houses, yards, streets, and public spaces come into dramatic focus in this lavishly illustrated portrait of antebellum Charleston. McInnis's innovative history of the city combines the aspirations of its would-be nobility, the labors of the African slaves who built and tended the town, and the ambitions of its architects, painters, writers, and civic promoters.

Tragic Method and Tragic Theology

Author: Larry D. Bouchard
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 9780271026190
Format: PDF
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The book moves in a nonreductive way between literary and theological criticism to show how drama and religious thought discern the experience of evil. &"Tragic method&" refers to how tragic art functions as inquiry; &"tragic theology&" refers to how drama and theology render in thematic or symbolic form certain irreducible dimensions of evil and negativity. Bouchard defines no single tragic method or any single view of evil but searches for the distinctive interplay of tragic method of theology in each dramatist. The work opens by scrutinizing certain important interpretations of Greek tragedy. Paul Ricoeur's interpretation of &"the Wicked God and the Tragic Vision&" receives major focus, as does Sophocles, who as a tragedian dramatized the action of inquiry and interpretation. Bouchard then examines Augustine's views of evil and sin, Reinhold Niebuhr's critique of the ironies of history, and Tillich's conceptions of the demonic. By interpreting tragedy in terms of sin or the effects of sin, each theologian resists implications in his own thought pointing to a less resolvable tragic theology. And yet these theologians also contribute very creative understandings of the irreducible character of evil and tragic experience. Substantive and original readings of three playwrights are offered: Rolf Hochhuth's tragedy of vocation, The Deputy, Robert Lowell's trilogy of American historical blindness, The Old Glory, and Peter Shaffer's dreams of tragic awareness and accountability in Equus and Amadeus, revealing new permutations of the irreducibility of evil in contemporary Christian and Jewish religious thinkers who may be helpful in this task, and concludes with a description of the experience of perplexed thought, self-critical in view of tragedy's witness to irreducibility of evil.

Disney Princess Royally Enchanted Cartoon Tales

Author: Disney Book Group
Publisher: Disney Press
ISBN: 9780786837151
Format: PDF, ePub
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Interweaves comic strips with blocks of prose to create stories for young readers which include the characters from "Cinderella," "Snow White," and "Sleeping Beauty."