U S Foreign Policy Toward the Third World A Post cold War Assessment

Author: Jurgen Ruland
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315497476
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The contributors to this work examine the evolution of U.S. foreign policy toward the Third World, and the new policy challenges facing developing nations in the post-Cold War era. The book incorporates the key assessment standards of U.S. foreign policies directed toward critical regions, including Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and Southeast Asia. Through this region-by-region analysis, readers will get the information and insight needed to fully understand U.S. policy objectives - especially with regard to economic and security issues in the wake of 9/11 - vis a vis the developing world. The book outlines both successes and failures of Washington, as it seeks to deal with the Third World in a new era of terrorism, trade, and democratic enlargement. It also considers whether anti-Western sentiment in Third World regions is a direct result of U.S. foreign policies since the end of the Cold War.

The Cold War in the Third World

Author: Robert J. McMahon
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199768684
Format: PDF, Docs
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This collection explores the complex interrelationships between the Soviet-American struggle for global preeminence and the rise of the Third World. Featuring original essays by twelve leading scholars, it examines the influence of Third World actors on the course of the Cold War.

Mission Failure

Author: Michael Mandelbaum
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019046948X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The end of the Cold War led to a dramatic and fundamental change in the foreign policy of the United States. In Mission Failure, Michael Mandelbaum, one of America's leading foreign-policy thinkers, provides an original, provocative, and definitive account of the ambitious but deeply flawed post-Cold War efforts to promote American values and American institutions throughout the world. In the decades before the Cold War ended the United States, like virtually every other country throughout history, used its military power to defend against threats to important American international interests or to the American homeland itself. When the Cold War concluded, however, it embarked on military interventions in places where American interests were not at stake. Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia and Kosovo had no strategic or economic importance for the United States, which intervened in all of them for purely humanitarian reasons. Each such intervention led to efforts to transform the local political and economic systems. The invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, launched in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, turned into similar missions of transformation. None of them achieved its aims. Mission Failure describes and explains how such missions came to be central to America's post-Cold War foreign policy, even in relations with China and Russia in the early 1990s and in American diplomacy in the Middle East, and how they all failed. Mandelbaum shows how American efforts to bring peace, national unity, democracy, and free-market economies to poor, disorderly countries ran afoul of ethnic and sectarian loyalties and hatreds and foundered as well on the absence of the historical experiences and political habits, skills, and values that Western institutions require. The history of American foreign policy in the years after the fall of the Berlin Wall is, he writes, "the story of good, sometimes noble, and thoroughly American intentions coming up against the deeply embedded, often harsh, and profoundly un-American realities of places far from the United States. In this encounter the realities prevailed."

Chinese Foreign Relations

Author: Robert G. Sutter
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 1442211369
Format: PDF, Docs
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China is rightly considered an emerging power in world affairs as Chinese leaders, backed by growing economic and military strength, engage in innovative diplomatic approaches that pave the way for China's international role. But this is only part of the story of China’s rise. As Robert G. Sutter shows in this meticulous and balanced assessment, the record of twists and turns in Chinese foreign relations since the end of the Cold War highlights a very different perspective. Domestic problems, nationalism, and security concerns continue to preoccupy Beijing, complicating China's influence and innovations in foreign affairs. On the international front, the actions of other powerful nations and growing dependence on the world economy complicate as well as enhance China’s advance to international prominence. Newly revised, this edition features more extensive treatment of China’s role in the international economy and greater discussion of its relations with the developing world. Providing a comprehensive introduction to Chinese foreign relations, Sutter shows Chinese leaders exerting growing influence in world affairs but remaining far from dominant. Facing numerous contradictions and trade-offs, they move cautiously to avoid major confrontations, costly commitments, or mistakes that could undermine their one-party rule as they deal with an international environment posing numerous challenges as well as opportunities for Chinese interests.

Strategies of Containment

Author: John Lewis Gaddis
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199883998
Format: PDF, Docs
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When Strategies of Containment was first published, the Soviet Union was still a superpower, Ronald Reagan was president of the United States, and the Berlin Wall was still standing. This updated edition of Gaddis' classic carries the history of containment through the end of the Cold War. Beginning with Franklin D. Roosevelt's postwar plans, Gaddis provides a thorough critical analysis of George F. Kennan's original strategy of containment, NSC-68, The Eisenhower-Dulles "New Look," the Kennedy-Johnson "flexible response" strategy, the Nixon-Kissinger strategy of detente, and now a comprehensive assessment of how Reagan - and Gorbechev - completed the process of containment, thereby bringing the Cold War to an end. He concludes, provocatively, that Reagan more effectively than any other Cold War president drew upon the strengths of both approaches while avoiding their weaknesses. A must-read for anyone interested in Cold War history, grand strategy, and the origins of the post-Cold War world.

Historical Dictionary of U S Diplomacy since the Cold War

Author: Tom Lansford
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 0810864320
Format: PDF, Docs
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The post-Cold War diplomacy of the United States evolved in stages that reflected changes in the international system. Through the 1990s, the nation's foreign affairs were marked by an evolution away from the post-World War II focus on security and superpower competition to a more multifaceted and nuanced series of policies that included economic concerns, social and cultural issues, and environmental matters. However, an escalating series of terrorist attacks that culminated in the 11 September 2001 strikes on New York and Washington, D.C. led to the reemergence of security as the main foreign policy issue for the United States. The subsequent American-led 'war on terror' mirrored the Cold War in its goals, and the administration of President George W. Bush endeavored to build a multinational counterterrorism coalition that paralleled the Western alliance of the bipolar era. The Historical Dictionary of U.S. Diplomacy Since the Cold War is a concise overview of the main figures, conflicts, events, and policies of the United States in the post-Cold War era. The study explores the main elements of U.S. foreign policy and the regional and international reaction to American policies from the presidency of George H. W. Bush to that of George W. Bush. Through its entries, the book analyzes the underlying themes of U.S. diplomacy and the new policies formulated and implemented in response to broad changes in global politics. The book includes a chronology of events from 1991 to 2007, an introduction that highlights important themes of the era, cross-referenced entries on significant topics, a detailed bibliography, and appendixes of major documents. The work is ideal for both public and academic libraries, the general public, or the specialist looking for a reference tool in this area.

The War on Terrorism and the American Empire after the Cold War

Author: Alejandro Colas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134258267
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This new study shows how the American-led ‘war on terror’ has brought about the most significant shift in the contours of the international system since the end of the Cold War. A new ‘imperial moment’ is now discernible in US foreign policy in the wake of the neo-conservative rise to power in the USA, marked by the development of a fresh strategic doctrine based on the legitimacy of preventative military strikes on hostile forces across any part of the globe. Key features of this new volume include: * an alternative, critical take on contemporary US foreign policy * a timely, accessible overview of critical thinking on US foreign policy, imperialism and war on terror * the full spectrum of critical view sin a single volume * many of these essays are now ‘contemporary classics’ The essays collected in this volume analyse the historical, socio-economic and political dimensions of the current international conjuncture, and assess the degree to which the war on terror has transformed the nature and projection of US global power. Drawing on a range of critical social theories, this collection seeks to ground historically the analysis of global developments since the inception of the new Bush Presidency and weigh up the political consequences of this imperial turn. This book will be of great interest for all students of US foreign policy, contemporary international affairs, international relations and politics.

The Eisenhower Administration the Third World and the Globalization of the Cold War

Author: Kathryn C. Statler
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9780742553811
Format: PDF
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In the US, the Cold War is often remembered as a two-power struggle. The Eisenhower administration placed an extremely high priority on victory in the Third World. This book assesses the impact of the globalizing Cold War and the process of decolonization on the Eisenhower administration's foreign policy. It is intended for diplomatic historians.

Shadow Cold War

Author: Jeremy Friedman
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469623773
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War has long been understood in a global context, but Jeremy Friedman's Shadow Cold War delves deeper into the era to examine the competition between the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China for the leadership of the world revolution. When a world of newly independent states emerged from decolonization desperately poor and politically disorganized, Moscow and Beijing turned their focus to attracting these new entities, setting the stage for Sino-Soviet competition. Based on archival research from ten countries, including new materials from Russia and China, many no longer accessible to researchers, this book examines how China sought to mobilize Asia, Africa, and Latin America to seize the revolutionary mantle from the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union adapted to win it back, transforming the nature of socialist revolution in the process. This groundbreaking book is the first to explore the significance of this second Cold War that China and the Soviet Union fought in the shadow of the capitalist-communist clash.

Changing US Foreign Policy toward India

Author: Carina van de Wetering
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137548622
Format: PDF
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This book uncovers how US-India relations have changed and intensified during the administrations of Bill Clinton, George Bush Jr., and Barack Obama. Throughout the Cold War, US-India relations were often distant and volatile as India mostly received attention at times of grave international crises, but from the late 1990s onwards, the US showed a more sustained interest in India. How was this shift possible? While previous scholarship has focused on the civilian nuclear deal as a turning point, this book presents an alternative account for this change by analyzing how India’s identity has been constructed in different terms after the Cold War. It examines the underlying discourse and explains how this enables or constrains US foreign policymakers when they establish security policies with India and improve US-India relations.