Wheel Fever

Author: Jesse J. Gant
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society Press
ISBN: 9780870206139
Format: PDF
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On rails-to-trails bike paths, city streets, and winding country roads, the bicycle seems ubiquitous in the Badger State. Yet there’s a complex and fascinating history behind the popularity of biking in Wisconsin—one that until now has never been told. Meticulously researched through periodicals and newspapers, Wheel Fever traces the story of Wisconsin’s first “bicycling boom,” from the velocipede craze of 1869 through the “wheel fever” of the 1890s. It was during this crucial period that the sport Wisconsinites know and adore first took shape. From the start it has been defined by a rich and often impassioned debate over who should be allowed to ride, where they could ride, and even what they could wear. Many early riders embraced the bicycle as a solution to the age-old problem of how to get from here to there in the quickest and easiest way possible. Yet for every supporter of the “poor man’s horse,” there were others who wanted to keep the rights and privileges of riding to an elite set. Women, the working class, and people of color were often left behind as middle- and upper-class white men benefitted from the “masculine” sport and all-male clubs and racing events began to shape the scene. Even as bikes became more affordable and accessible, a culture defined by inequality helped create bicycling in its own image, and these limitations continue to haunt the sport today. Wheel Fever is about the origins of bicycling in Wisconsin and why those origins still matter, but it is also about our continuing fascination with all things bicycle. From “boneshakers” to high-wheels, standard models to racing bikes, tandems to tricycles, the book is lushly illustrated with never-before-seen images of early cycling, and the people who rode them: bloomer girls, bicycle jockeys, young urbanites, and unionized workers. Laying the foundations for a much-beloved recreation, Wheel Fever challenges us to imagine anew the democratic possibilities that animated cycling’s early debates.

The Cycling City

Author: Evan Friss
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022621091X
Format: PDF
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As Evan Friss shows in his mordant history of urban bicycling in the late nineteenth century, the bicycle has long told us much about cities and their residents. In a time when American cities were chaotic, polluted, and socially and culturally impenetrable, the bicycle inspired a vision of an improved city in which pollution was negligible, transport was noiseless and rapid, leisure spaces were democratic, and the divisions between city and country blurred. Friss focuses not on the technology of the bicycle but on the urbanisms that bicycling engendered. Bicycles altered the look and feel of cities and their streets, enhanced mobility, fueled leisure and recreation, promoted good health, and shrank urban spaces as part of a larger transformation that altered the city and the lives of its inhabitants, even as the bicycle's own popularity fell, not to rise again for a century.

Muscle on Wheels

Author: M. Ann Hall
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773555331
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The majestic high-wheel bicycle, with its spider wheels and rubber tires, emerged in the mid-1870s as the standard bicycle. A common misconception is that, bound by Victorian dress and decorum, women were unable to ride it, only taking up cycling in the 1880s with the advent of the chain-driven safety bicycle. On the contrary, women had been riding and even racing some form of the bicycle since the first vélocipèdes appeared in Europe early in the nineteenth century. Challenging the understanding that bicycling was a purely masculine sport, Muscle on Wheels tells the story of women's high-wheel racing in North America in the 1880s and early 1890s, with a focus on a particular cyclist: Louise Armaindo (1857–1900). Among Canada's first women professional athletes and the first woman who was truly successful as a high-wheel racer, Armaindo began her career as a strongwoman and trapeze artist in Chicago in the 1870s before discovering high-wheel bicycle racing. Initially she competed against men, but as more women took up the sport, she raced them too. Although Armaindo is the star of Muscle on Wheels, the book is also about other women cyclists and the many men – racers, managers, trainers, agents, bookmakers, sport administrators, and editors of influential cycling magazines – who controlled the sport, especially in the United States. The story of working-class Victorian women who earned a living through their athletic talent, Muscle on Wheels showcases an exciting moment in women's and athletic history that is often forgotten or misconstrued.

Angst und Schrecken im Wahlkampf

Author: Hunter S. Thompson
Publisher: Heyne Verlag
ISBN: 3641172144
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Zwölf Monate aus dem Leben des legendären Gonzojournalisten 1972 hat Hunter S. Thompson die Tour des amerikanischen Präsidentschaftswahlkampfes begleitet und in diesem Buch schonungslos Bilanz gezogen. Er enthüllt die Intrigen hinter den Kulissen des Wahlkampfes und entlarvt dabei die Mechanismen des politischen Machtkampfes. Ein kritisches Statement, das noch immer Gültigkeit hat.

Die Radsport Mafia und ihre schmutzigen Gesch fte

Author: Tyler Hamilton
Publisher: Piper Verlag
ISBN: 3492961770
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Tyler Hamilton war ein Naturtalent, einer der leidensfähigsten und zähesten Radfahrer, bei US Postal der zweite Mann hinter Lance Armstrong. In seinem Buch erzählt er, wie die Amerikaner sich in den Neunzigern die Seele aus dem Leib fuhren und dennoch keine Chance gegen europäische Teams hatten, die immer schneller waren, immer noch Luft hatten - bis die Mannschaft anfängt, sich spritzen zu lassen. Er legt offen, wie straff organisiert dieses System war, das das berühmteste Radrennen der Welt zur Tour de Farce werden ließ, wie korrupte Ärzte und skrupellose Teamchefs agieren und Mannschaften zu gut geölten Maschinen wurden. Wie eine ganze Sportart buchstäblich unter die Räder kam und eine Parallelwelt aus Lügen, Angst und Manipulation entstand, die ehemalige Helden als lädierte Wracks zurücklässt.

Der lange Weg zur Freiheit

Author: Nelson Mandela
Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag
ISBN: 3104031541
Format: PDF, ePub
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»Ich bin einer von ungezählten Millionen, die durch Nelson Mandelas Leben inspiriert wurden.« Barack Obama Eine fast drei Jahrzehnte währende Gefängnishaft ließ Nelson Mandela zum Mythos der schwarzen Befreiungsbewegung werden. Kaum ein anderer Politiker unserer Zeit symbolisiert heute in solchem Maße die Friedenshoffnungen der Menschheit und den Gedanken der Aussöhnung aller Rassen wie der ehemalige südafrikanische Präsident und Friedensnobelpreisträger. Auch nach seinem Tod finden seine ungebrochene Charakterstärke und Menschenfreundlichkeit die Bewunderung aller friedenswilligen Menschen auf der Welt. Mandelas Lebensgeschichte ist über die politische Bedeutung hinaus ein spannend zu lesendes, kenntnis- und faktenreiches Dokument menschlicher Entwicklung unter Bedingungen und Fährnissen, vor denen die meisten Menschen innerlich wie äußerlich kapituliert haben dürften.