Whistlin and Crowin Women of Appalachia

Author: Katherine Kelleher Sohn
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 9780809326815
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Even some enlightened academicians automatically— and incorrectly— connect illiteracy to Appalachia, contends Katherine Kelleher Sohn. After overhearing two education professionals refer to the southern accent of a waiter and then launch into a few redneck jokes, Sohn wondered why rural, working-class white people are not considered part of the multicultural community. Whistlin’ and Crowin’ Women of Appalachia: Literacy Practices since College examines the power of women to rise above cultural constraints, complete their college degrees, assume positions of responsibility, and ultimately come to voice. Sohn, a born southerner and assimilated Appalachian who moved from the city more than thirty years ago, argues that an underclass of rural whites is being left out of multicultural conversations. She shares how her own search for identity in the academic world (after enrolling in a doctoral program at age fifty) parallels the journeys of eight nontraditional, working-class women. Through interviews and case studies, Sohn illustrates how academic literacy empowers women in their homes, jobs, and communities, effectively disproving the Appalachian adage: “ Whistlin’ women and crowin’ hens, always come to no good ends.” Sohn situates the women’ s stories within the context of theory, self confidence, and place. She weaves the women’ s words with her own, relating voice to language, identity, and power. As the women move from silence to voice throughout and after college— by maintaining their dialect, discovering the power of expressivist writing, gaining economic and social power, and remaining in their communities— they discover their identity as strong women of Appalachia. Sohn focuses on the power of place, which figures predominantly in the identity of these women, and colorfully describes the region. These Appalachian women who move from silence to voice are the purveyors of literacy and the keepers of community, says Sohn. Serving as the foundation of Appalachian culture in spite of a patriarchal society, the women shape the region even as it shapes them. Geared to scholars of literacy studies, women’ s studies, and regional studies, Whistlin’ and Crowin’ Women of Appalachia will also resonate with those working with other marginalized populations who are isolated economically, geographically, or culturally.

Language Diversity in the Classroom

Author: Geneva Smitherman
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809388995
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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It’s no secret that, in most American classrooms, students are expected to master standardized American English and the conventions of Edited American English if they wish to succeed. Language Diversity in the Classroom: From Intention to Practice works to realign these conceptions through a series of provocative yet evenhanded essays that explore the ways we have enacted and continue to enact our beliefs in the integrity of the many languages and Englishes that arise both in the classroom and in professional communities. Edited by Geneva Smitherman and Victor Villanueva, the collection was motivated by a survey project on language awareness commissioned by the National Council of Teachers of English and the Conference on College Composition and Communication. All actively involved in supporting diversity in education, the contributors address the major issues inherent in linguistically diverse classrooms: language and racism, language and nationalism, and the challenges in teaching writing while respecting and celebrating students’ own languages. Offering historical and pedagogical perspectives on language awareness and language diversity, the essays reveal the nationalism implicit in the concept of a “standard English,” advocate alternative training and teaching practices for instructors at all levels, and promote the respect and importance of the country’s diverse dialects, languages, and literatures. Contributors include Geneva Smitherman, Victor Villanueva, Elaine Richardson, Victoria Cliett, Arnetha F. Ball, Rashidah Jammi` Muhammad, Kim Brian Lovejoy, Gail Y. Okawa, Jan Swearingen, and Dave Pruett. The volume also includes a foreword by Suresh Canagarajah and a substantial bibliography of resources about bilingualism and language diversity.

Teaching Writing in Thirdspaces

Author: Rhonda C. Grego
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809327724
Format: PDF
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"Rhonda C. Grego and Nancy S. Thompson argue that because the studio is physically and institutionally "outside but alongside" both students' other coursework and the hierarchy of the institution, it represents a "thirdspace," a unique position in which to effect institutional change. Teaching/Writing in Thirdspaces provides an alternative approach to traditional basic writing courses that can be adopted in educational institutions of all types and at all levels."--BOOK JACKET.

Girls Literacy Experiences in and Out of School

Author: Elaine O'Quinn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 041589736X
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Through thoughtful analysis of girls' historical literacy experiences, their contemporary reading and writing lives, and trends in young adult literature, this book sheds new light on how teachers can better understand and create classroom experiences that make girls visible both to themselves and to others.Historically, the status of girls has evoked much less research than that of boys. Recently emerging scholastic and strategic study concerning the vulnerability of girls is adding a vital missing component to this continually emerging discourse. Looking at many aspects of girls' gendered lives, this text considers the specific perspectives of the social and cultural constructions that script gender, particularly as applies to girls in our classrooms. Prominent scholars in their respective fields examine the myriad forces that shape the lives of American girls, from the earliest didactic records of manuals and books of conduct to current artifacts of contemporary culture. By investigating both the scholarly literature on girls as well as well as the primary sources of a material culture, the authors seek to unravel how adolescent girls learn and seek to compose identities. By closely examining girls' practices, in which are embedded issues of class, race, ethnicity, immigrant status, and sexuality, the text considers some of the values, structures, and trajectories that have come to define teenage girlhood. Its distinctive contribution is to unpack some of the assumptions of girls in English classrooms and to critically examine their experiences as they try to fit preconceived norms while forming their own personhood"-- Provided by publisher.

Rereading Appalachia

Author: Sara Webb-Sunderhaus
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813165601
Format: PDF
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Appalachia faces overwhelming challenges that plague many rural areas across the country, including poorly funded schools, stagnant economic development, corrupt political systems, poverty, and drug abuse. Its citizens, in turn, have often been the target of unkind characterizations depicting them as illiterate or backward. Despite entrenched social and economic disadvantages, the region is also known for its strong sense of culture, language, and community. In this innovative volume, a multidisciplinary team of both established and rising scholars challenge Appalachian stereotypes through an examination of language and rhetoric. Together, the contributors offer a new perspective on Appalachia and its literacy, hoping to counteract essentialist or class-based arguments about the region's people, and reexamine past research in the context of researcher bias. Featuring a mix of traditional scholarship and personal narratives, Rereading Appalachia assesses a number of pressing topics, including the struggles of first-generation college students and the pressure to leave the area in search of higher-quality jobs, prejudice toward the LGBT community, and the emergence of Appalachian and Affrilachian art in urban communities. The volume also offers rich historical perspectives on issues such as the intended and unintended consequences of education activist Cora Wilson Stewart's campaign to promote literacy at the Kentucky Moonlight Schools. A call to arms for those studying the heritage and culture of Appalachia, this timely collection provides fresh perspectives on the region, its people, and their literacy beliefs and practices.

A Taste for Language

Author: James Ray Watkins
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 080932931X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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“This is a book about the American Dream as it has become embodied in the university in general and in the English department in particular,” writes James Ray Watkins at the start of A Taste for Language: Literacy, Class, and English Studies. In it, Watkins argues that contemporary economic and political challenges require a clear understanding of the identity of English studies, making elementary questions about literacy, language, literature, education, and class once again imperative. A personal history of university-level English studies in the twentieth century, A Taste for Language combines biography, autobiography, and critical analysis to explore the central role of freshman English and literary studies in the creation and maintenance of the middle class. It tells a multi-generational story of the author and his father, intertwined with close reading of texts and historical analysis. The story moves from depression-era Mississippi, where the author's father was born, to a contemporary English department, where the author now teaches. Watkins looks at not only textbooks, scholars, and the academy but also at families and other social institutions. A rich combination of biography, autobiography, and critical analysis, A Taste for Language questions what purpose an education in English language and literature serves in the lives of the educated in a class-based society and whether English studies has become wholly irrelevant in the twenty-first century.

The Managerial Unconscious in the History of Composition Studies

Author: Donna Strickland
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809330261
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In this pointed appraisal of composition studies, Donna Strickland contends the rise of writing program administration is crucial to understanding the history of the field. Noting existing histories of composition studies that offer little to no exploration of administration, Strickland argues the field suffers from a “managerial unconscious” that ignores or denies the dependence of the teaching of writing on administrative structures. The Managerial Unconscious in the History of Composition Studies is the first book to address the history of composition studies as a profession rather than focusing on its pedagogical theories and systems. Strickland questions why writing and the teaching of writing have been the major areas of scholarly inquiry in the field when specialists often work primarily as writing program administrators, not teachers. Strickland traces the emergence of writing programs in the early twentieth century, the founding of two professional organizations by and for writing program administrators, and the managerial overtones of the “social turn” of the field during the 1990s. She illustrates how these managerial imperatives not only have provided much of the impetus for the growth of composition studies over the past three decades but also have contributed to the stratified workplaces and managed writing practices the field’s pedagogical research often decries. The Managerial Unconscious in the History of Composition Studies makes the case that administrative work should not be separated from intellectual work, calling attention to the interplay between these two kinds of work in academia at large and to the pronounced hierarchies of contingent faculty and tenure-track administrators endemic to college writing programs. The result is a reasoned plea for an alternative understanding of the very mission of the field itself.

Rereading Appalachia

Author: Sara Webb-Sunderhaus
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 081316561X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
Appalachia faces overwhelming challenges that plague many rural areas across the country, including poorly funded schools, stagnant economic development, corrupt political systems, poverty, and drug abuse. Its citizens, in turn, have often been the target of unkind characterizations depicting them as illiterate or backward. Despite entrenched social and economic disadvantages, the region is also known for its strong sense of culture, language, and community. In this innovative volume, a multidisciplinary team of both established and rising scholars challenge Appalachian stereotypes through an examination of language and rhetoric. Together, the contributors offer a new perspective on Appalachia and its literacy, hoping to counteract essentialist or class-based arguments about the region's people, and reexamine past research in the context of researcher bias. Featuring a mix of traditional scholarship and personal narratives, Rereading Appalachia assesses a number of pressing topics, including the struggles of first-generation college students and the pressure to leave the area in search of higher-quality jobs, prejudice toward the LGBT community, and the emergence of Appalachian and Affrilachian art in urban communities. The volume also offers rich historical perspectives on issues such as the intended and unintended consequences of education activist Cora Wilson Stewart's campaign to promote literacy at the Kentucky Moonlight Schools. A call to arms for those studying the heritage and culture of Appalachia, this timely collection provides fresh perspectives on the region, its people, and their literacy beliefs and practices.

Primary Research and Writing

Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317663810
Format: PDF
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Developed for emerging academic writers, Primary Research and Writing offers a fresh take on the nature of doing research in the writing classroom. Encouraging students to write about topics for which they have a passion or personal connection, this text emphasizes the importance of primary research in developing writing skills and abilities. Authors Lynée Lewis Gaillet and Michelle F. Eble have built a pedagogical approach that makes archival and primary research interesting, urgent, and relevant to emerging writers. Students are able to explore ways of analyzing their findings and presenting their results to their intended readers. With in-text features to aid students in understanding primary research and its role in their writing, chapters include special elements such as: Communities in Context – Profiles of traditional and digital communities that help students understand the characteristics of communities and group members Profiles of Primary Researchers – Spotlights on professionals, giving an illuminating look into the role primary research plays in real-world research and writing Student Writing – Examples of exemplary student writing that demonstrate how research can be relevant, engaging, and interesting, with annotations. Invention Exercises - Exercises designed to help students locate primary investigation within communities that they already understand or find appealing Writing Exercises - Writing exercises that offer students practice in exploring communities and investigating primary materials. Readings – Annotated readings with questions to guide analysis, pulled from a variety of rich sources, that give students inspiration for undertaking their own research projects. This text has a robust companion website that provides resources for instructors and students, with sample syllabi, chapter overviews, lecture outlines, sample assignments, and a list of class resources. Primary Research and Writing is an engaging textbook developed for students in the beginning stages of their academic writing careers, and prepares its readers for a lifetime of research and writing.