Wolfkiller

Author: Harvey Leake
Publisher: Gibbs Smith
ISBN: 9781423611684
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A page-turning epic with life lessons from a Navajo shepherd

Arizona s Historic Trading Posts

Author: Carolyn O'Bagy Davis
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467132497
Format: PDF, ePub
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On the sparsely settled Arizona reservation lands, trading posts were important centers for commerce as well as social gathering destinations. With a subsistence economy, the posts offered opportunities to trade sheep, wool, and crafts for necessities such as flour, coffee, sugar (known as "sweet-salt"), and tools. Most often, traders were Anglos, living as partners among their Indian neighbors. They often were the only contact with the outside culture, and their stores provided an outlet for local arts such as rugs, pottery, baskets, and jewelry. Traders helped with correspondence, transportation, and sickness, and they even buried the dead. Trading posts were the sites of marriages and murders; they were destinations for artists, scientists, and adventurous tourists. With the coming of roads and automobiles, trading posts have all but disappeared, but the stories and photographs shared in this volume offer a glimpse into a vanishing time in the Southwest.

On the Borders of Love and Power

Author: David Wallace Adams
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520272390
Format: PDF, ePub
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Embracing the crossroads that made the region distinctive, this book reveals how American families have always been characterized by greater diversity than idealizations of the traditional family have allowed. He essays show how family life figured prominently in relations to larger struggles for conquest and control.

Both Sides of the Bullpen

Author: Robert S. McPherson
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806159405
Format: PDF, ePub
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Between 1880 and 1940, Navajo and Ute families and westward-trending Anglos met in the “bullpens” of southwestern trading posts to barter for material goods. As the products of the livestock economy of Navajo culture were exchanged for the merchandise of an industrialized nation, a wealth of cultural knowledge also changed hands. In Both Sides of the Bullpen, Robert S. McPherson reveals the ways that Navajo tradition fundamentally reshaped and defined trading practices in the Four Corners area of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado. Drawing on oral histories of Native peoples and traders collected over thirty years of research, McPherson explores these interactions from both perspectives, as wool, blankets, and silver crossed the counter in exchange for flour, coffee, and hardware. To succeed, traders had to meet the needs and expectations of their customers, often interpreted through Navajo cultural standards. From the organization of the post building to gift giving, health care and burial services, and a credit system tailored to the Navajo calendar, every feature of the trading post served trader and customer alike. Over time, these posts evolved from ad hoc business ventures or profitable cooperative stores into institutions with a clearly defined set of expectations that followed Navajo traditional practices. Traders spent their days evaluating craft work, learning the financial circumstances of each Native family, following economic trends in the wool and livestock industry back east, and avoiding conflict. In detail and depth, the many voices woven throughout Both Sides of the Bullpen restore an underappreciated era to the history of the American Southwest. They show us that for American Indians and white traders alike in the Four Corners region during the late 1800s and early 1900s, barter was as much a cultural expression as it was an economic necessity.

Viewing the Ancestors

Author: Robert S. McPherson
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806145692
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Anaasází people left behind marvelous structures, the ruins of which are preserved at Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon, and Canyon de Chelly. But what do we know about these people, and how do they relate to Native nations living in the Southwest today? Archaeologists have long studied the American Southwest, but as historian Robert McPherson shows in Viewing the Ancestors, their findings may not tell the whole story. McPherson maintains that combining archaeology with knowledge derived from the oral traditions of the Navajo, Ute, Paiute, and Hopi peoples yields a more complete history. McPherson’s approach to oral tradition reveals evidence that, contrary to the archaeological consensus that these groups did not coexist, the Navajos interacted with their Anaasází neighbors. In addition to examining archaeological literature, McPherson has studied traditional teachings and interviewed Native people to obtain accounts of their history and of the relations between the Anaasází and Athapaskan ancestors of today’s Hopi, Pueblo, and Navajo peoples. Oral history, McPherson points out, tells why things happened. For example, archaeological findings indicate that the Hopi are descended from the Anaasází, but Hopi oral tradition better explains why the ancient Puebloans may have left the Four Corners region: the drought that may have driven the Anaasází away was a symptom of what had gone wrong within the society—a point that few archaeologists could derive from what is found in the ground. An important text for non-Native scholars as well as Native people committed to retaining traditional knowledge, Viewing the Ancestors exemplifies collaboration between the sciences and oral traditions rather than a contest between the two.

Reflections of Grand Canyon Historians

Author: Todd R. Berger
Publisher: Grand Canyon Assn
ISBN: 9781934656006
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In January 2007, hundreds of historians, witnesses to history, National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service employees, hikers, river runners, and history buffs gathered on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park for the second Grand Canyon History Symposium. The symposium came alive with thirty-six presentations on topics from new evidence about the Powell expedition to rarely published reflections on Hopi cultural connections to the Grand Canyon to a robust debate on whether James White did or did not raft through the canyon in 1867. Reflections of Grand Canyon Historians collects thirtytwo papers based on the presentations at the symposium, offering an offbeat anthology of Grand Canyon history. Readers will find this a thought-provoking and entertaining book, a unique collection of historical events tied to the Crown Jewel of the National Park System. Accessible to lay readers, Reflections of Grand Canyon Historians will challenge your thinking while filling your mind with cowboys, hermits, towering figures in conservation history, near-naked river runners, honored veterans, visionary naturalists, and shutter-happy mule wranglers. The book will fascinate anyone interested in the history of the Southwest and of America’s national parks.