Women in Frankish Society

Author: Suzanne Fonay Wemple
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 1512821330
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
Women in Frankish Society is a careful and thorough study of women and their roles in the Merovingian and Carolingian periods of the Middle Ages. During the 5th through 9th centuries, Frankish society transformed from a relatively primitive tribal structure to a more complex hierarchical organization. Suzanne Fonay Wemple sets out to understand the forces at work in expanding and limiting women's sphere of activity and influence during this time. Her goal is to explain the gap between the ideals and laws on one hand and the social reality on the other. What effect did the administrative structures and social stratification in Merovingian society have on equality between the sexes? Did the emergence of the nuclear family and enforcement of monogamy in the Carolingian era enhance or erode the power and status of women? Wemple examines a wealth of primary sources, such deeds, testaments, formulae, genealogy, ecclesiastical and secular court records, letters, treatises, and poems in order to reveal the enduring German, Roman, and Christian cultural legacies in the Carolingian Empire. She attends to women in secular life and matters of law, economy, marriage, and inheritance, as well as chronicling the changes to women's experiences in religious life, from the waning influence of women in the Frankish church to the rise of female asceticism and monasticism.

Unmarriages

Author: Ruth Mazo Karras
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 081220641X
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
The Middle Ages are often viewed as a repository of tradition, yet what we think of as traditional marriage was far from the only available alternative to the single state in medieval Europe. Many people lived together in long-term, quasimarital heterosexual relationships, unable to marry if one was in holy orders or if the partners were of different religions. Social norms militated against the marriage of master to slave or between individuals of very different classes, or when the couple was so poor that they could not establish an independent household. Such unions, where the protections that medieval law furnished to wives (and their children) were absent, were fraught with danger for women in particular, but they also provided a degree of flexibility and demonstrate the adaptability of social customs in the face of slowly changing religious doctrine. Unmarriages draws on a wide range of sources from across Europe and the entire medieval millennium in order to investigate structures and relations that medieval authors and record keepers did not address directly, either in order to minimize them or because they were so common as not to be worth mentioning. Ruth Mazo Karras pays particular attention to the ways women and men experienced forms of opposite-sex union differently and to the implications for power relations between the genders. She treats legal and theological discussions that applied to all of Europe and presents a vivid series of case studies of how unions operated in specific circumstances to illustrate concretely what we can conclude, how far we can speculate, and what we can never know.

Women In Dark Age And Early Medieval Europe C 500 1200

Author: Helen M. Jewell
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 0230213790
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
The period 1200-1550 opened in a time of population expansion but went on to suffer the demographically cataclysmic effects of the plague, beginning with the Black Death of 1347-51. The period dawned with a confident papacy and the Albigensian crusade against heretics and ended with the Catholic church torn apart by the Protestant Reformation. Huge challenges were affecting society in various ways, but they did not always affect men and women in the same ways. Helen M. Jewell provides a lively survey of western European women's activities and experiences during this timeframe. The core chapters investigate: - the function of women in the countryside and towns - the role of women in the ruling and landholding classes - women within the context of religion. This practical centre of the book is embedded in an analysis of the gender theories inherited from the earlier Middle Ages which continued to underpin laws which restricted women's activity, an education system which offered them inferior institutional provision, and a church which denied them ministry. Three individuals who vastly exceeded these expectations, crashing through the 'glass ceilings' of their day, are brought together in a fascinating final chapter. Combining a historiographical survey of trends over the last thirty years with more recent scholarship, this is as indispensable introduction for anyone with an interest in women's history from the late Medieval period through to the Reformation.

Frankish World 750 900

Author: Jinty Nelson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 0826422128
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
During the central middle ages to modem times, western Europeans were often known to their neighbours and enemies as Franks. This was due to the creation of a Frankish Empire in the eighth and ninth centuries which embraced much of Latin Christendom. Usually referred to as the Carolingian period, this volume instead invites us into a Frankish world. This shifts the accent from the dynasty of the Carolingian family to the people that made up the Frankish population and, in fact, pre-dated the Carolingians. The essays collected in this volume reflect the Frankish world from a variety of angles, but in particular the main topics include: - Carolingian politics and ritual; - Dimensions of early medieval thought; - Gender history. These essays, written over the past ten years, look beyond the aggression and intolerance often associated with the Carolingian empire and look instead towards the pluralistic alternative to domination and the plentiful potential for change and adaptation this period offered.

Daughters of the Church

Author: Ruth A. Tucker
Publisher: Zondervan
ISBN: 0310877466
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Rich in historical events and colorfully written, this fascinating account of women in the church spans nearly two thousand years of church history. It tells of events and aspirations, determination and disappointment, patience and achievement that mark the history of daughters of the church from the time of Jesus to the present. The authors have endeavored to present an objective story. The very fact that readers may find themselves surprised now and again by the prominent role of women in certain events and movements proves an inequality that historical narrative has often been guilty of. This is a book about women. It is a setting straight off the record -- a restoring of balance to history that has repeatedly played down the significance of the contributions of women to the theology, the witness, the movements, and the growth of the church. An exegetical study of relevant Scripture passages offers stimulating thought for discussion and for serious reevaluation of historical givens. This volume is enriched by pictures, appendixes, bibliography, and indexes. Like many of the women whose stories it tells, this book has a subdued strength that should not be underestimated.

Women and Aristocratic Culture in the Carolingian World

Author: Valerie L. Garver
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801464951
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
Despite the wealth of scholarship in recent decades on medieval women, we still know much less about the experiences of women in the early Middle Ages than we do about those in later centuries. In Women and Aristocratic Culture in the Carolingian World, Valerie L. Garver offers a fresh appraisal of the cultural and social history of eighth- and ninth-century women. Examining changes in women's lives and in the ways others perceived women during the early Middle Ages, she shows that lay and religious women, despite their legal and social constrictions, played integral roles in Carolingian society. Garver's innovative book employs an especially wide range of sources, both textual and material, which she uses to construct a more complex and nuanced impression of aristocratic women than we've seen before. She looks at the importance of female beauty and adornment; the family and the construction of identities and collective memory; education and moral exemplarity; wealth, hospitality and domestic management; textile work, and the lifecycle of elite Carolingian women. Her interdisciplinary approach makes deft use of canons of church councils, chronicles, charters, polyptychs, capitularies, letters, poetry, exegesis, liturgy, inventories, hagiography, memorial books, artworks, archaeological remains, and textiles. Ultimately, Women and Aristocratic Culture in the Carolingian World underlines the centrality of the Carolingian era to the reshaping of antique ideas and the development of lasting social norms.

Eleanor of Aquitaine

Author: D. Owen
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9780631201014
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
This fascinating new biography tells the story of one of the most influential figures of the twelfth century, Eleanor of Aquitaine, successively queen of France and of England. In tracing her life story Professor Owen reassesses her political importance during the reigns of her husband Henry II and her sons, Richard the Lionheart and John, and aims to separate the true historical Eleanor from the Eleanor of legend.

The Arma Christi in Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture

Author: Professor Andrea Denny-Brown
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9781409456766
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
This book explores the multiple resonances and representations of the arma Christi, the ‘instruments of the Passion,’ in medieval and early modern culture. From the weapons used to torment and sacrifice the body of Christ sprang a reliquary tradition that produced active and contemplative devotional practices, complex literary narratives, intense lyric poems, striking visual images, and innovative architecture. The verbal and visual representations that accrued from these holiest of relics, and the practices they in turn inspired, are relevant to a wide variety of critical fields and theoretical approaches. This collection capitalizes on recent work on these most central of medieval ‘objects,’ and produces, through its interdisciplinary and intergenerational scholarly collaboration, a fresh view of the multiple intersections of the spiritual and the material in the Middle Ages. It also includes a new edition of the English arma Christi poem known as ‘O Vernicle’ from previously unpublished manuscripts.

Women in Early Medieval Europe 400 1100

Author: Lisa M. Bitel
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521597739
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
This is a history of the early European middle ages through the eyes of women, combining the rich literature of women's history with original research in the context of mainstream history and traditional chronology. The book begins at the end of the Roman empire and ends with the start of the long eleventh century, when women and men set out to test the old frontiers of Europe. The book recreates the lives of ordinary women but also tells personal stories of individuals. Each chapter also questions an assumption of medieval historiography, and uses the few documents produced by women themselves, along with archaeological evidence, art, and the written records of medieval men, to tell of women, their experiences and ideas, and their relations with men. It covers the continent and its exotic edges, such as Iceland, Ireland, and Iberia; looking at women Christian and non-Christian alike.