Work and Migration

Author: Karen Fog Olwig
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134503059
Format: PDF, Docs
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Using case-studies from those who have moved either transnationally or internally within their own country, international contributors offer various definitions of what it means to make a living on the move.

Migrant Citizenship from Below

Author: K. Shinozaki
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137410426
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Migrant Citizenship from Below explores the dynamic local and transnational lives of Filipina and Filipino migrant domestic workers living in Schönberg, Germany. Shinozaki examines their irregular migrant citizenship status from 'above', which is produced by complex interactions between Germany's welfare, care, and migration regimes and the Philippines' gendered politics of overseas employment. Despite the predominant representation of these workers as invisible, these spatially immobile migrants maintain sustained transnational engagements through parenting and religious practices. Shinozaki studies the reverse-gendered process of international reproductive labor migration, in which women traveled first and were later joined by men. Despite their structural vulnerability, participant observations and biographical interviews with the migrants demonstrate that they enact and negotiate migrant citizenship in the workplace, transnational households, religious practices and through accessing health provisions.

Ethnologia Europaea

Author: Marie Sandberg
Publisher: Museum Tusculanum Press
ISBN: 8763542382
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Disorder and order are among the principles through which the articles in this issue are connected. Peter Jan Margry grasps the exuberant excesses surrounding the Dutch monarch’s birthday with the term “mobocracy” and sees in the suspension of rules a means to reconcile Dutch republicanism with the anachronism of a monarchical system. Ongoing disorder of a rather different nature is experienced by migrant workers from Poland in Denmark. Niels Jul Nielsen and Marie Sandberg accompany them at work and in their different home settings and analyse the divergent interplay of the Polish labour niche and family dynamics on different constructions of “orderly work conditions”. Stefan Groth uncovers the structuring power of new tools and events to measure performance in recreational cycling; competitive norms are shown to permeate a leisure activity. Old age, too, is not free from the structuring arm of social and health regimes. Through his analysis of billiards – a game favoured by the older men he studies – Aske Juul Lassen critiques aging policies striving to “activate” the elderly and overlooking the rhythms inherent to a traditional game – and activity. The issue concludes with Tuuli Lähdesmäki’s comparison of how local heritage actors choose to narrate the transnationally launched European Heritage Label. Within an initiative to foster Europeanization, she finds actors formulating European identities in different moulds.

Children s Places

Author: Karen Fog Olwig
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 0415296404
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Children's Places examines the ways in which children and adults, from their different vantage-points in society, negotiate the 'proper place' of children in both social and spatial terms. It looks at some of the recognised constructions of children, including perspectives from cultures that do not distinguish children as a distinct category of people, as well as examining contexts for them, from schools and kindergartens to inner cities and war-zones. The result is a much-needed insight into the notions of inclusion and exclusion, the placement and displacement of children within generational ranks and orders, and the kinds of places that children construct for themselves. Based on in-depth ethnographic research from Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, Australia and New Zealand.

Transnational Social Work Practice

Author: Nalini Junko Negi
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231526318
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A growing number of people& dash;immigrants, refugees, asylum-seekers, displaced individuals and families& mdash;lead lives that transcend national boundaries. Often because of economic pressures, these individuals move continually among places, countries, or cultures, never residing in one residence long enough to establish healthy and stable ties. Though migration itself has existed for centuries, today's sophisticated technologies and electronic communications, as well as the availability of fast and cheap transportation, enable transmigrants to develop transnational identities and relationships and engage in transnational activities. Yet despite the transnational nature of these lives, social work lacks a transnational social work practice. In this innovative and pioneering volume, practitioners and scholars specializing in transnational issues develop a framework for transnational social work practice. They begin with the historical and environmental context of transnational practice, exploring the economic, ecological, and additional factors that affect at-risk and vulnerable transnational groups. They then detail practical strategies, supplemented with case examples, for working with transnational populations, concluding with ways to incorporate transnational social work into the curriculum.

State Nation Transnation

Author: Katie Willis
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134414080
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This edited volume examines the relationship between the nation and the transnation, focusing on transnational communities in the Asia-Pacific region. Setting the book within a theoretical framework, the authors explore a range of themes such as migration, identity and citizenship in chapters on China, the Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam, Japan, Indonesia, Australia, Singapore and Cambodia.

The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies

Author: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191645885
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students worldwide studying displacement either from traditional disciplinary perspectives or as a core component of newer programmes across the Humanities and Social and Political Sciences. Today the field encompasses both rigorous academic research which may or may not ultimately inform policy and practice, as well as action-research focused on advocating in favour of refugees' needs and rights. This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterise this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.

Wagadu Volume 5

Author: Tiantian Zheng
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1465331611
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This volume of Wagadu: A Journal of Transnational Womens and Gender Studies launches its third printed edition. Wagaduthe Soninke name of the Ghana Empirecontrolled the present-day Mali, Mauritania and Senegal and was famous for its prosperity and power from approximately 300-1076 CE. It constituted the bridge between North Africa, the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern worlds and Sub-Saharan Africa. Ghana gave birth to the two most powerful West African Empires: Mali and Songhay. The modern country of Ghana (former British Gold Coast) derives its name from the Ghana Empire. Why Wagadu? Wagadu has come to be the symbol of the sacrifice women continue to make for a better world. Wagadu has become the metaphor for the role of women in the family, community, country, and planet. In this volume the authors grapple with the intersecting discourses on anti-trafficking, human rights, and social justice, edited by Tiantian Zheng, associate professor of anthropology at SUNY Cortland. Duna taka siro no yagare npale The world does not go without women. Tiantian Zheng is associate professor of Anthropology at SUNY Cortland and author of the forthcoming book _Red Lights: The Lives of Sex Workers in Postsocialist China_, by University of Minnesota Press, in 2009.

Global Heartland

Author: Faranak Miraftab
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253019427
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Global Heartland is the account of diverse, dispossessed, and displaced people brought together in a former sundown town in Illinois. Recruited to work in the local meat-processing plant, African Americans, Mexicans, and West Africans re-create the town in unexpected ways. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in the US, Mexico, and Togo, Faranak Miraftab shows how this workforce is produced for the global labor market; how the displaced workers’ transnational lives help them stay in these jobs; and how they negotiate their relationships with each other across the lines of ethnicity, race, language, and nationality as they make a new home. Beardstown is not an exception but an example of local-global connections that make for local development. Focusing on a locality in a non-metropolitan region, this work contributes to urban scholarship on globalization by offering a fresh perspective on politics and materialities of placemaking.

Refugees Immigrants and Education in the Global South

Author: Lesley Bartlett
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135080305
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The unprecedented human mobility the world is now experiencing poses new and unparalleled challenges regarding the provision of social and educational services throughout the global South. This volume examines the role played by schooling in immigrant incorporation or exclusion, using case studies of Thailand, India, Nepal, Hong Kong/PRC, the Philippines, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Kenya, Egypt, South Africa, Senegal, Sudan, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic. Drawing on key concepts in anthropology, the authors offer timely sociocultural analyses of how governments manage increasing diversity and how immigrants strategize to maximize their educational investments. The findings have significant implications for global efforts to expand educational inclusion and equity.