Wounded Knee 1973

Author: Stew Magnuson
Publisher: Courtbridge Publishing
ISBN: 9780985299613
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"Wounded Knee 1973 : Still Bleeding" gives an overview of the occupation, the conference, and some of the unresolved issues discussed leading up to the 40th anniversary of the siege in February 2013.

Wounded Knee 1973

Author: Stanley David Lyman
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803279339
Format: PDF, Docs
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Stanley Lyman, who was the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) superintendent at the Pine Ridge Reservation in 1973, gives an inside view of what happened when the American Indian Movement (AIM) activists occupied the village of Wounded Knee. Close to the action, he recorded it with unusual candor, directing his sorrow, frustration, and occasional anger to all parties involved—the Tribal Council, the Justice Department, the BIA, FBI, and AIM. His account of the besiegers and besieged reveals a well-meaning and intelligent man forced by dramatic events to reevaluate some long-cherished assumptions. It deserves to be read and studied in any attempt to understand fully Wounded Knee II.

Ghost Dancing the Law

Author: John William Sayer
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674001848
Format: PDF
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This first book-length study of the Wounded Knee trials demonstrates the impact that legal institutions and the media have on political dissent. John Sayer draws on court records, news reports, and interviews with participants to show how the defense, and ultimately the prosecution, had to respond continually to legal constraints, media coverage, and political events taking place outside the courtroom.

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

Author: Dee Brown
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1453274146
Format: PDF
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The “fascinating” #1 New York Times bestseller that awakened the world to the destruction of American Indians in the nineteenth-century West (The Wall Street Journal). First published in 1970, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee generated shockwaves with its frank and heartbreaking depiction of the systematic annihilation of American Indian tribes across the western frontier. In this nonfiction account, Dee Brown focuses on the betrayals, battles, and massacres suffered by American Indians between 1860 and 1890. He tells of the many tribes and their renowned chiefs—from Geronimo to Red Cloud, Sitting Bull to Crazy Horse—who struggled to combat the destruction of their people and culture. Forcefully written and meticulously researched, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee inspired a generation to take a second look at how the West was won. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dee Brown including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.

Red Power

Author: Alvin M. Josephy
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803225879
Format: PDF
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Red Power is a classic documentary history of the American Indian activist movement. This landmark second edition considerably expands and updates the original, illustrating the development of American Indian political activism from the 1960s through the end of the twentieth century. ø Included in the fifty selections are influential statements by Indian organizations and congressional committees, the texts of significant laws, and the articulate voices of individuals such as Clyde Warrior, Vine Deloria Jr., Dennis Banks, Wilma Mankiller, Ada Deer, and Russell Means. The selections are organized around key issues: the nature of the original Red Power protest; tribal identity, self-determination, and sovereignty; land claims and economic development; cultural traditions and spirituality; education; and reservation conditions.

Voices of Wounded Knee

Author: William S. E. Coleman
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803205680
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In Voices of Wounded Knee, William S. E. Coleman brings together for the first time all the available sources-Lakota, military, and civilian-on the massacre of 29 December 1890. He recreates the Ghost Dance in detail and shows how it related to the events leading up to the massacre. Using accounts of participants and observers, Coleman reconstructs the massacre moment by moment. He places contradictory accounts in direct juxtaposition, allowing the reader to decide who was telling the truth.

Hippies Indians and the Fight for Red Power

Author: Sherry L. Smith
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199939373
Format: PDF
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Through much of the 20th century, federal policy toward Indians sought to extinguish all remnants of native life and culture. That policy was dramatically confronted in the late 1960s when a loose coalition of hippies, civil rights advocates, Black Panthers, unions, Mexican-Americans, Quakers and other Christians, celebrities, and others joined with Red Power activists to fight for Indian rights. In Hippies, Indians and the Fight for Red Power, Sherry Smith offers the first full account of this remarkable story. Hippies were among the first non-Indians of the post-World War II generation to seek contact with Native Americans. The counterculture saw Indians as genuine holdouts against conformity, inherently spiritual, ecological, tribal, communal-the original "long hairs." Searching for authenticity while trying to achieve social and political justice for minorities, progressives of various stripes and colors were soon drawn to the Indian cause. Black Panthers took part in Pacific Northwest fish-ins. Corky Gonzales' Mexican American Crusade for Justice provided supplies and support for the Wounded Knee occupation. Actor Marlon Brando and comedian Dick Gregory spoke about the problems Native Americans faced. For their part, Indians understood they could not achieve political change without help. Non-Indians had to be educated and enlisted. Smith shows how Indians found, among this hodge-podge of dissatisfied Americans, willing recruits to their campaign for recognition of treaty rights; realization of tribal power, sovereignty, and self-determination; and protection of reservations as cultural homelands. The coalition was ephemeral but significant, leading to political reforms that strengthened Indian sovereignty. Thoroughly researched and vividly written, this book not only illuminates this transformative historical moment but contributes greatly to our understanding of social movements.

Like a Hurricane

Author: Paul Chaat Smith
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 145877872X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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For a brief but brilliant season beginning in the late 1960s, American Indians seized national attention in a series of radical acts of resistance. Like a Hurricane is a gripping account of the dramatic, breathtaking events of this tumultuous period. Drawing on a wealth of archival materials, interviews, and the authors' own experiences of these events, Like a Hurricane offers a rare, unflinchingly honest assessment of the period's successes and failures.

American Indian Mafia

Author: Joseph H. Trimbach
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781432707781
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"...[A] photographic look at the wildlife and landscapes, throughout the seasons, at Holmes Lake in Lincoln, Nebraska..." - back cover.

Ruling Pine Ridge

Author: Akim D. Reinhardt
Publisher: Texas Tech University Press
ISBN: 9780896726017
Format: PDF, Kindle
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“Reinhardt furnishes revealing portraits of Gerald One Feather, Dick Wilson, Russell Means; he offers a telling indictment of Pine Ridge’s economy. He is one of the few historians who understands the distinction D’Arcy McNickle made decades ago between loss and defeat. He and the late Vine Deloria, Jr. would have welcomed this volume because of its thorough research and, above all, its unflinching honesty. Writing in 1970 Deloria called for historians to ‘bring historical consciousness to the whole Indian story.’ Ruling Pine Ridge achieves that goal. It will be required reading for all who care about not only the indigenous past but as well its connection to the problems of the present and the challenges of the 21st century.” —Peter Iverson, author of Diné: A History of the Navajos Incorporating previously overlooked materials, including tribal council records, oral histories, and reservation newspapers, Ruling Pine Ridge explores the political history of South Dakota’s Oglala Lakota reservation during the mid-twentieth century. Akim D. Reinhardt examines the reservation’s transition from the direct colonialism of the pre–1934 era to the indirect colonial policies of the controversial Indian Reorganization Act (IRA). The new federal approach to Indian politics was evident in the advent of the tribal council governing system, which is still in place today on Pine Ridge and on many other reservations. While the structure of the reservation’s governing body changed dramatically to reflect mainstream American cultural values, certain political equations on the reservation changed very little. In particular, despite promises to the contrary, the new reservation government’s authority was still severely constrained by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. In addition, the new governing format led to an aggravation of social divisions on the reservation. Reinhardt then examines the period of 1968–1973, showing that many of the political players on the reservation had changed, and although the tribal council system was well established by this point, deep dissatisfaction with the IRA government persisted on Pine Ridge. This longstanding unhappiness came to a head in 1973, with the occupation and siege of Wounded Knee. Reinhardt demonstrates that the siege is best understood not as a political stunt of the American Indian Movement (AIM), but as a spontaneous, grassroots protest that was at least forty years in the making.