Young Ireland and the Writing of Irish History

Author: James Quinn
Publisher: University College Dublin Press
ISBN: 191082092X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Examines why Young Ireland attached such importance to the writing of history, how it went about writing that history, and what impact their historical writings had.

Young Ireland

Author: Sir Charles Gavan Duffy
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Irish people's edition " pt 1 A fragment of Irish history, 1840-1845 - pt 2 Four years of Irish history, 1845-1849.

Reading Irish Histories

Author: Lawrence W. McBride
Publisher: Four Courts PressLtd
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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An array of historians, social scientists, and scholars of literature examines how representatives of various political, social, and educational institutions and diverse cultural traditions employed the written word.

Thomas Davis and Ireland

Author: Helen Mulvey
Publisher: CUA Press
ISBN: 9780813213033
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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To provide a more thorough, objective portrait of Davis, historian Helen F. Mulvey here presents a scholarly examination of Davis's life and thoughts."

The Cambridge History of Ireland Volume 2 1550 1730

Author: Jane Ohlmeyer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108592279
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This volume offers fresh perspectives on the political, military, religious, social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and environmental history of early modern Ireland and situates these discussions in global and comparative contexts. The opening chapters focus on 'Politics' and 'Religion and War' and offer a chronological narrative, informed by the re-interpretation of new archives. The remaining chapters are more thematic, with chapters on 'Society', 'Culture', and 'Economy and Environment', and often respond to wider methodologies and historiographical debates. Interdisciplinary cross-pollination - between, on the one hand, history and, on the other, disciplines like anthropology, archaeology, geography, computer science, literature and gender and environmental studies - informs many of the chapters. The volume offers a range of new departures by a generation of scholars who explain in a refreshing and accessible manner how and why people acted as they did in the transformative and tumultuous years between 1550 and 1730.

Ireland 1800 1850

Author: Desmond Keenan
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1465318674
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Anyone studying or teaching Irish history, or who likely to be involved in discussions on the subject, should first get the facts straight. It is my aim to provide, as far as possible, the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, about one particular period. This book is a companion to my other book Pre-Famine Ireland: Social Structure. I had accumulated such a vast quantity of material, often from untouched sources, that I was unable to include it in one volume of reasonable size. So it was necessary to order all material of a social and economic character in one volume, and historical narrative in another. But in places, in explaining legislation for example I felt it necessary to give brief accounts of social, political, or economic circumstances. The period 1800 to 1850 in Irish history has not been particularly frequently or well researched. Distortions too were caused by the political objectives of the various writers. Facts were selected, omitted, or twisted to suit political objectives. Catholic or nationalist writers wrote with their own religious and political objectives in mind, and Protestants or loyalists likewise. To this day the contending factions in Northern Ireland defend their stances by reference to the version of history favoured by their own side. It has often been observed that truth is the first casualty in any conflict, but it is also true that the loss or distortion of truth causes the conflict. Ireland was not an abnormal country in 1800. It could in many ways be compared with the young United States, and the disparities in their wealth and size of population were nothing like what they were later to become. British influence in Ireland had commenced some centuries before it had in the American colonies, and in each case the influence went far beyond political influence. It spread to language customs and institutions. The Irish Parliament received from Britain relative independence in 1782, and the American colonies absolute independence in 1783. Ireland, like the United States, had an upper ruling Protestant elite, and a lower class largely excluded from positions of power. The big difference was that this underclass of coloured people was a minority in the United States, while in Ireland the excluded Catholics formed a majority. By 1829 Irish Catholics had largely achieved political equality with Protestants, while the American Negroes received political equality, by the standards of the time, in 1866. The independence of the Irish Parliament was ended in 1800 because it was realized that the ruling Protestant elite in Ireland would never give political equality to Catholics for precisely the same reasons that southern American States would never give political equality to Negroes. In an era when political corruption was rife the whites would have to bribe the blacks to get anything. Everyone knows what happened to the American Negroes after 1866 when the actual conditions for democratic participation was left to be determined by the individual states. Ireland, like the United States, in the first half of the century was largely at peace. Though a great war raged around it, it was not invaded. Like the United States, its efforts were directed towards the arts of peace. Like the United States also its population grew rapidly. Though America had ultimately a safety valve in the great prairies to its west, and possessed abundant minerals, much of its development in the first half of the century was in the mountainous and forested states of the east. The population expanded up the mountains and into the forests, and, as in Ireland, gradually refluxed either into the great cities, or into the lands to the west. The difference was that in the United States this migration was within the country, while for the Irish the great cities and better lands were outside her borders. Like in Britain and the United States the use of machinery in the textile industry led to

Palgrave Advances in Irish History

Author: M. McAuliffe
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230238998
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book provides a much-needed historiographical overview of modern Irish History, which is often written mainly from a socio-political perspective. This guide offers a comprehensive account of Irish History in its manifold aspects such as family, famine, labour, institutional, women, cultural, art, identity and migration histories.

Histories of Nationalism in Ireland and Germany

Author: Shane Nagle
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474263755
Format: PDF, Docs
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Focusing on the era in which the modern idea of nationalism emerged as a way of establishing the preferred political, cultural, and social order for society, this book demonstrates that across different European societies the most important constituent of nationalism has been a specific understanding of the nation's historical past. Analysing Ireland and Germany, two largely unconnected societies in which the past was peculiarly contemporary in politics and where the meaning of the nation was highly contested, this volume examines how narratives of origins, religion, territory and race produced by historians who were central figures in the cultural and intellectual histories of both countries interacted; it also explores the similarities and differences between the interactions in these societies. Histories of Nationalism in Ireland and Germany investigates whether we can speak of a particular common form of nationalism in Europe. The book draws attention to cultural and intellectual links between the Irish and the Germans during this period, and what this meant for how people in either society understood their national identity in a pivotal time for the development of the historical discipline in Europe. Contributing to a growing body of research on the 'transnationality' of nationalism, this new study of a hitherto-unexplored area will be of interest to historians of modern Germany and Ireland, comparative and transnational historians, and students and scholars of nationalism, as well as those interested in the relationship between biography and writing history.

Travel Writing and Ireland 1760 1860

Author: G. Hooper
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230510817
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Travel Writing and Ireland, 1760-1860 examines a range of mainly British travel and travel-writing material from the period 1760 to 1860. Beginning with an analysis of the Home Tour and Ireland's function within it, the book then considers the role of the Post-Union traveller, followed by an analysis of the impressions formed by Famine writers; the book then concludes with an assessment of those who journeyed to Ireland in the immediate aftermath of Famine. Following a chronological structure, Travel Writing and Ireland, 1760-1860 offers readings of hitherto under-researched material from a significant period in Irish history.